Ivan III


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Related to Ivan III: Ivan IV, Michael Romanov

Ivan III

(ˈaɪvən)
n
(Biography) known as Ivan the Great. 1440–1505, grand duke of Muscovy (1462–1505). He expanded Muscovy, defeated the Tatars (1480), and assumed the title of Ruler of all Russia (1472)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

I•van

(ˈaɪ vən; Russ. iˈvɑn)
n.
1. Ivan III, ( “Ivan the Great” ) 1440–1505, grand duke of Muscovy 1462–1505.
2. Ivan IV, ( “Ivan the Terrible” ) 1530–84, first czar of Russia 1547–84.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Noun1.Ivan III - grand duke of Muscovy whose victories against the Tartars laid the basis for Russian unity (1440-1505)
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References in periodicals archive ?
He accompanied Sofia Paleologus, the daughter of the last Byzantine Emperor, to Russia where she wed the Tsar Ivan III.(52) His return to Rome in the early spring of 1473 is perhaps referred to in Pandonis's poem: "We had to hurry because the time [for the preparation of the theater] was short."(53) Surely Leto was the person who convinced Pietro Riario (and Sixtus) that this celebration offered an opportunity for a new kind of entertainment, one that would present Rome as a cultural center in which a new kind of revival of antiquity could be produced.
Moscow gradually united the Russian principalities under its own leadership, and Ivan III (1440-1505) made himself the first national Russian sovereign.
The LLS's depiction of Ivan III's campaigns against Novgorod in the 1470s marches forward inexorably.
We are presented with an image of a |Third Rome', sealed from the influence of Renaissance Latin and of Peter the Great's Westernization policies with precedents in the eras of Ivan III, Boris Godunov, and also Alexis (pp.
Basil III (1479-1533) became czar of Russia in 1505 on the death of his father, Ivan III. He incorporated Pskov, the last independent realm in Russia, into his dominions in 1510, so that the Russian principalities were now completely united.
For for caps, see LLS 8:254 (Dmitrii Ivanovich); 15:28 (Ivan III); for the Cap of Monomachus, see LLS 10:433 (Vasilii Dmitrievich); and 17:359 (Dmitrii Ivanovich, grandson of Ivan III).
Created by Ivan III in the 15th century, the square was originally a market place.
In September 1567, upon request, Ivan issued an immunity charter to Simonov Monastery Abbot Feoktist, to confirm a previous immunity charter issued by Ivan III, for a village (slobodka) in Mozhaisk.
Keenan, "Ivan III, Nikolai Karamzin, and the Legend of the 'Casting off of the Tatar Yoke' (1480)," in The New Muscovite Cultural History: A Collection in Honor of Daniel B.
Books on the early modern Muscovite departmental, central administration, or chancellery system (prikaznaia sistema) almost exclusively had dealt with this phenomenon either from beginning to end, from Ivan III to Peter, or with more restricted but still broad time periods, such as the 16th or 17th centuries.