Ivan III


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Related to Ivan III: Ivan IV, Michael Romanov

Ivan III

(ˈaɪvən)
n
(Biography) known as Ivan the Great. 1440–1505, grand duke of Muscovy (1462–1505). He expanded Muscovy, defeated the Tatars (1480), and assumed the title of Ruler of all Russia (1472)

I•van

(ˈaɪ vən; Russ. iˈvɑn)
n.
1. Ivan III, ( “Ivan the Great” ) 1440–1505, grand duke of Muscovy 1462–1505.
2. Ivan IV, ( “Ivan the Terrible” ) 1530–84, first czar of Russia 1547–84.
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Noun1.Ivan III - grand duke of Muscovy whose victories against the Tartars laid the basis for Russian unity (1440-1505)
References in periodicals archive ?
Looking on from great distance are the opposing forces: at the upper left, Casimir, King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania, and at the upper right, Ivan III and his boyars, each group separated from Novgorod by a jagged outcrop.
1505: Death of Ivan III the Great, Czar of Russia, after a 43-year reign during which his state tripled in size.
6 In history, which Russian tsar was known as 'Ivan the Terrible': Ivan III or Ivan IV ?
The Kremlin was first inhabited by Russia's rulers when Grand Prince Ivan III moved there after he had assumed the title 'Grand Prince of All the Russia' in 1475.
Buscando reconstituir essa heranca sovietica a partir de suas raizes, o capitulo dois faz um resgate da politica externa nos tempos czaristas tracando o periodo de 1462 a 1505, quando Ivan III (Ivan "o Grande") reinou sobre o estado Moscovita, sendo sucedido por Ivan IV (Ivan "o terrivel") que governou de 1533 a 1584, dando inicio a expansao do poder moscovita para territorios nao russos.
Las torres que guardan los rincones de la muralla triangular asi como aquellas en los cuales se ubican las puertas de entrada v salida, son obra de los arquitectos italianos que llegaron a Rusia invitados por el zar Ivan III.
Indeed, historians have counted as many as 25 such cycles since the reign of Tsar Ivan III.
By 1480, under the reign of Ivan III, Russia could claim sovereignty.
Eisenstein produced several successive variations of his plans for treating Moscow over time, but most start with Ivan the Terrible (some begin with Ivan III and go on to Ivan the Terrible, others start with the Tartar invasion in medieval times).
A very different perspective shines forth from Edward Allworth's "Russia's Eastern Orientation: Ambivalence toward West Asia," which misidentifies Ivan III as "son-in-law of the defeated Byzantine emperor" (142).
These influences began gradually after the fall of Constantinople of the Eastern Roman Empire to the Turks in 1453, and intensified in the following centuries, spreading also to the north in Russia with Ivan III, who drew closer to Rome and ushered in the Latin penetration during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and later with Peter the Great, who actually institutionalized Protestant influences throughout the eighteenth century.
THE GRAND Principality of Moscow gained its independence from the Mongol Golden Horde in the fifteenth century under Ivan III, the Great, who vastly extended Muscovite territory.