ivory-billed woodpecker

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i·vo·ry-billed woodpecker

 (ī′və-rē-bĭld′, īv′rē-)
n.
A large, possibly extinct woodpecker (Campephilus principalis) of the southern United States and Cuba, having black plumage, white wing patches, an ivory-colored bill, and a bright red crest in the male. Also called ivorybill.

i′vory-billed` wood′pecker


n.
a large black-and-white woodpecker, Campephilus principalis, of the southern U.S. and Cuba: close to extinction. Also called i′vory-bill`.
[1805–15, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ivory-billed woodpecker - large black-and-white woodpecker of southern United States and Cuba having an ivory billivory-billed woodpecker - large black-and-white woodpecker of southern United States and Cuba having an ivory bill; nearly extinct
peckerwood, woodpecker, pecker - bird with strong claws and a stiff tail adapted for climbing and a hard chisel-like bill for boring into wood for insects
Campephilus, genus Campephilus - a genus of Picidae
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the early 20th century scientists have been trying to prove the ivory-bill woodpecker is extinct, dismissing claims of sightings despite many reports to the contrary.
Like, when producers for NPR's ``All Things Considered'' asked the 30-year-old eclectic folk singer to write a song about the ivory-bill woodpecker - the bird thought to be extinct for the last 50 years until it was recently spotted in an Arkansas swamp - he jumped at the chance, handing over ``The Lord God Bird.