Izanami


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Related to Izanami: Amaterasu
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Noun1.Izanami - sister and consort of Izanami; mother of the islands and gods of Japan
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We should not overlook they are always in love-and-hate relation, the God Izanagi and the Goddess Izanami.
For example, the mythological passage of the quarrel between the couple Izanagi and Izanami, who gave birth to the islands of future Japan, shows clearly the division of the country of the Alive and of the Dead:
The tale derives from the eighth-century Kojiki, the earliest known chronicle about the making of Japan by deities including the god Izanagi and goddess Izanami. At the far right, a monstrous, lion-like figure representing Izanagi thrusts a sword toward the central figure with an octopus-like head and attenuated body.
But Izanami says that she has already eaten the food from that realm, implying that it would be difficult for her to return easily to this one.
Elison also saw in this scene an unconscious response to Fabian's (and Yutei's) insult of the sacred creation myth of goddess Izanami giving birth to the nation of Japan in Nihongi, in similarly vulgar language, presented in MyOtei mondo.
The Japanese creation myth "Izanagi and Izanami" relates the story of a divine pair of lovers whose sexual union begets all of humanity.
Moreover, there appear many types of patriarchal discriminations by Japanese men toward women, and as an infrastructure, I used the Japanese genesis myth of Izanagi and Izanami. In this sense, I think that Nihyakkaiki or The 200th Anniversary of the Dead, which brought me the Mishima Literary Award, might be more appealing to the American or English speaking audience, if ever translated into English.
3); and the image of worms swarming in a rotten corpse evokes that of the primordial goddess Izanami, from the netherworld impurity of which her husband Izanagi brings about a fundamental spurt of creation (Aston 1990, 1:24, 29-30; Mauclaire 1982, 94; Philippi 1992, 61-63).