Coetzee

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Coetzee

(ˈkɜːtzɪ)
n
(Biography) J(ohn) M(ichael). born 1940, South African novelist: his works include Life and Times of Michael K (1983), Age of Iron (1990), Disgrace (1999), and Elizabeth Costello (2003); Nobel prize for literature (2003)
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discusses both J. M. Coetzee's and (the fictional) Elizabeth
J. M. Coetzee's The Childhood of Jesus: The Ethics of Ideas and Things
Dat die eerste en tot dusver enigste biografie oor J. M. Coetzee deur 'n Afrikaanse literator in Afrikaans geskryf is (hoewel terselfdertyd vertaal in Engels), is 'n anomalie gegee J.
J. M. Coetzee's summertime: mistranslation, linguistic unhousedness, and the extraterritorial literary community
Following the perspective Coetzee has in "What Is Classic?," these two texts indicate stories respectively pertaining to two writers, one being the fictional Crusoe and the other the real-life J. M. Coetzee, who are recast as Cruso and John Coetzee to reveal two differentiated modes of literary survival from what comes prior to them as the canonical.
To suggest that there is an untimeliness about J. M. Coetzee's latest sequence of anti-novels, from Youth (2002) through to Summertime (2009), is to observe a determinate lack of fit--perhaps even an unfitness--between the writing and its time, or times.
Only too aware of the risk one may run when dealing with three of J. M. Coetzee's novels in just a few pages (1), I shall try here to follow a thread which is not totally new to the author's ethics and critique of representation (both of selfhood and otherness).
Taking as a starting point South African-born J. M. Coetzee's representation of his new land Australia, that is, of his Australia as an imaginative prospect, a complex of territorial and national memory, this essay will consider how his engagement with the genre or subgenre of settler realism, both knowing and critical, manifests in both his imaginative geographies as a mode at once of disconnection from and of affiliation to what for want of a better word in his case might be called the nation.
J. M. Coetzee's latest fictionalized autobiography seems to pose the same question.
J. M. Coetzee, who was profiled in our Jan/Feb 2004 issue, received the 2003 Nobel Prize in Literature and is a twotime Man Booker Prize recipient.
If she wins, she will be pipping two- time winner reclusive South African author J. M. Coetzee, whose likely absence from the awards ceremony was also making headlines on Tuesday.