Jacksonian


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Jack·so·ni·an

 (jăk-sō′nē-ən)
adj.
Of or relating to Andrew Jackson, his concepts of popular government, or his presidency.

Jack·so′ni·an n.
Jack·so′ni·an·ism n.

Jacksonian

(dʒækˈsəʊnɪən)
adj
(Historical Terms) of or relating to a person surnamed Jackson, esp Andrew Jackson

Jack•so•ni•an

(dʒækˈsoʊ ni ən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Andrew Jackson or his ideas, political principles, etc.
n.
2. a follower of Andrew Jackson or his ideas.
[1815–25, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jacksonian - a follower of Andrew Jackson or his ideas
follower - a person who accepts the leadership of another
Adj.1.Jacksonian - of or pertaining to Andrew Jackson or his presidency or his concepts of popular democracy
References in periodicals archive ?
The third trend is a "Jacksonian impulse" that the United States is currently experiencing.
For Trump does indeed fit coherently into a standard American foreign policy school of thought, espousing a Jacksonian world view that has been around since the 1820s and that almost no one outside the US has any real knowledge of.
Resurrecting Leather-Stocking: Pathfinding in Jacksonian America
THE YEARS FROM 1815 to 1845 are usually called the Jacksonian Era, but no one person can define the lives of millions.
Whether he's decrying the "Jacksonian consensus" over the means of westward migration, which promoted a ruthless regime "forged in frontier expansion and racist war," or critiquing free trade agreements like NAFTA and post-9/11 American foreign policy, with its open-ended wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, Grandin finds plenty of targets of all political stripes.
How presidents and candidates used cultural politics to win elections in Jacksonian America.
Tariff Wars and the Politics of Jacksonian America.
On the book's last page, a Franklin Roosevelt quote supplies a benediction: the Jacksonian "heritage" is "the American doctrine that entrusts the general welfare to no one group or class, but dedicates itself to the end that American people shall not be thwarted in their high purpose to remain the custodians of their own destiny."
(1951) The Jacksonian, one of Jackson's first magazines, made its debut with the city's mayor Allen C.
Professor Logel also discusses the inherent tensions between Thayer's narrow view of a curriculum focused on military engineering and the public clamor of the Jacksonian era for West Point to graduate engineers trained in civil engineering.
Donald Trump is a Jacksonian. In his book "Special Providence," Walter Russell Mead explains that Andrew Jackson represents a distinctly populist style of American thinking that is quite different from the country's other major ideological traditions.