Jacobean


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Jac·o·be·an

 (jăk′ə-bē′ən)
adj.
Of or having to do with the reign of James I of England or his times.
n.
A prominent figure during this period.

[From New Latin Iacobaeus, from Late Latin Iacōbus, Iacobus, James, Jacob; see Jacob.]

Jacobean

(ˌdʒækəˈbɪən)
adj
1. (Historical Terms) history characteristic of or relating to James I of England or to the period of his rule (1603–25)
2. (Furniture) of or relating to the style of furniture current at this time, characterized by the use of dark brown carved oak
3. (Architecture) denoting, relating to, or having the style of architecture used in England during this period, characterized by a combination of late Gothic and Palladian motifs
n
(Historical Terms) any writer or other person who lived in the reign of James I
[C18: from New Latin jacōbaeus, from Jacōbus James]

Jac•o•be•an

(ˌdʒæk əˈbi ən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to James I of England or to his period.
2. of or pertaining to the style of literature and drama produced during the early 17th century.
n.
3. a writer, statesman, or other personage of the Jacobean period.
[1750–60; < New Latin Jacobae(us) of Jacobus (Latinized form of James) + -an1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jacobean - any distinguished personage during the reign of James IJacobean - any distinguished personage during the reign of James I
Englishman - a man who is a native or inhabitant of England
Adj.1.Jacobean - of or relating to James I or his reign or times; "Jacobean writers"
Translations
jakobínský

Jacobean

[ˌdʒækəˈbiːən] ADJde la época de Jacobo I (de Inglaterra)

Jacobean

[ˌdʒækəˈbiːən] adjjacobéen(ne)

Jacobean

adjaus der Zeit Jakobs I.

Jacobean

[ˌdʒækəˈbiːən] adj (Brit) → dell'epoca di Giacomo I
References in classic literature ?
We have already observed that, as Shakspere's career suggests, there was no abrupt change in either life or literature at the death of Queen Elizabeth in 1603; and in fact the Elizabethan period of literature is often made to include the reign of James I, 1603-1625 (the Jacobean period [Footnote: 'Jaco'bus' is the Latin form of 'James.']), or even, especially in the case of the drama, that of Charles I, 1625-1649 (the Carolean period).
The second place among the Elizabethan and Jacobean dramatists is universally assigned, on the whole justly, to Ben Jonson, [Footnote: This name is spelled without the h .] who both in temperament and in artistic theories and practice presents a complete contrast to Shakspere.
When they were together the Jacobean and the Victorian ages were juxtaposed.
It was a farm-house tea, and to Philip very quaint and charming in that Jacobean house.
This was destroyed by fire in 1543, and some of its smoke-blackened corner stones were used when, in Jacobean times, a brick country house rose upon the ruins of the feudal castle.
When the Jacobean version of the New Testament was in process of evolution the pious and learned men engaged in the work insisted by a majority vote on translating the Greek word "Aides" as "Hell"; but a conscientious minority member secretly possessed himself of the record and struck out the objectional word wherever he could find it.
But you must think of that lonely death in the tawdry dressing-room simply as a strange lurid fragment from some Jacobean tragedy, as a wonderful scene from Webster, or Ford, or Cyril Tourneur.
You have a reproduction of a 17th-century Jacobean armchair.
The Nitra diocese proposed this step within the Jacobean pilgrimage route project, or Saint James' Way, which will be added in and around Nitra this year.
Mndez de Vigo announces the declaration of the Jacobean Year 2021 as an Event of Exceptional Public Interest
A short video uploaded online and attracting netizen attention shows an art expert seemingly melting an old Jacobean painting, when in fact he was restoring it.
Sensory Experience and the Metropolis on the Jacobean Stage (1603-1625).