Jacobean style

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Jacobean style


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A general term for seventeenth-century English furniture. It initially differed little from Tudor work until continental-style arabesque carving and mannerist decorations grew in popularity. Upholstery and lightness became more general, as did the gateleg table. The Commonwealth (1649–60) reduced decorating to a minimum, typified by the Cromwell chair. From 1660, England rejoined the European baroque mainstream and began the Age of Walnut.
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Cardiff Archaeology Society is looking forward to the second half of the winter lecture programme on January 10 when Dr John Kenyon will be lecturing on Elizabethan and Jacobean architecture, which he has called Proud Ambitious Heaps.
Designed by its owner Sir Charles Monck, who was inspired on his honeymoon to Athens, it is a fantastic example of Jacobean architecture.
Hailed as one of the country's finest surviving examples of Jacobean architecture, the Grade I-listed building has been closed to the public for almost three years while skilled craftsmen painstakingly restored its unique features, many of which date back to the time of the Civil Wa r.
The book is about Elizabethan and Jacobean architecture, the secret 'conceits' or messages hidden in buildings, and Girouard's own search for the real-life houses described in the treasure trove of sketches by the designer Robert Smythson (now owned by the Royal Institute of British Architects).
The hall is one of the finest examples of Jacobean architecture in the country.
With its stunning Jacobean architecture dating back to 1619, you can see why the Americans were impressed.
Pevsner observes that the building's chastity and bareness must have seemed as foreign to contemporary beholders, used to the entertaining elaborations of Elizabethan and Jacobean architecture, as Modernism was to the Edwardians.