jambolan


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jambolan

(ˈdjæmbəˌlæn)
n
(Plants) an evergreen tree of the Myrtaceae family that is native to southern Asia and which produces a fruit that is edible and which is also used in alternative medicine
References in periodicals archive ?
Founded by Tang Ekkhung, whose restaurant Sek Meas became a household name in Kampong Cham province, Khting Vor Cafe serves unusual but healthy drinks made from unusual tropical fruits including canistel, wood apple and jambolan.
According to the details, from Dharampura to Mughalpura, 1000 saplings of Jambolan had been planted, 300 plants of Bauhinia variegata (Kachnar) planted from Lalpul to Harbanspura, 2000 saplings of Palkan from Harbanspura to Jallo, 800 plants of Nishter from Harbanspura to Kheerapul-BRB.
He said that from Dharampura to Mughalpura, 1,000 saplings of Jambolan had been planted, 300 plants of Bauhinia variegata (Kachnar) planted from Lalpul to Harbanspura, 2,000 saplings of Palkan from Harbanspura to Jallo, 800 plants of Nishter from Harbanspura to Kheerapul-BRB.
Actividad antibacteriana de los extractos de Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels (jambolan) frente a los microorganismos asociados a la mastitis bovina.
At least, that is the hope of many women meeting beneath a Jambolan tree in the village some 60 kilometres (35 miles) from the central Pakistan city of Multan, its shade protecting them from the blazing sun.
According to a notification dated June 5, the varsity's Tree Auction Committee, in its meeting headed by Vice-Chancellor (VC) Prof Dr Mujeebuddin Sahrai, approved the highest bid of Rs250,000 for 50 trees, including neem, jambolan, rosewood, eucalyptus and four other species sold at Rs5,000 per tree.
For the menus of the Southeast region, it was possible to observe the presence of avocado, brejauva, persimmon, starfruit, guava, jabuticaba, jackfruit, jambolan, orange, mango, sugarapple, sapucaia and sapoti.
The reducing potential of PE in this study was higher than the antioxidant capacity of some concentrated extracts of nontraditional Brazilian fruits such as camu-camu and uvaia jambolan. The fruits of camu-camu showed the highest antioxidant capacity, with a value of 2501.5 [+ or -] 74.5 [micro]mol sulfate ferrous/g.
Jambolan (Syzygium cumini Lam), black nightshade (Solanum nigrum Linn), inga edulis (Inga edulis Mart), and Japanese grape (Hovenia dulcis Thunb) are unexplored fruits and few studies have been published on characterizing the bioactive compounds and antioxidant capacity of the pulps, peels, and seeds of these fruits.
Analyzing the fatty acid profile of jambolan seeds (Syzygium cumini L.), Luzia and Jorge (2009) obtained 67.91% of the total unsaturated fatty acids, including 24.10% of monounsaturated fatty acids and 43.81% of polyunsaturated acids, with linoleic acid being the major component.
Aqueous and alcoholic extracts of leaves from plants of jabuticaba (Myrciaria cauliflora (Mart.)), guava (Psidium guajava (L.)), and jambolan (Syzygium cumini (L.)), all of the family Myrtaceae, were used at a 10% concentration, according to the previous studies of Fruet (2010) and De Bona (2012), which showed inhibitory action on various serovars of Salmonella spp.