James I

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James I

1566-1625.
King of England (1603-1625) and of Scotland as James VI (1567-1625). The son of Mary Queen of Scots, he succeeded the heirless Elizabeth I as the first Stuart king of England. His belief in the divine right of kings and his attempts to abolish Parliament and suppress Presbyterianism in Scotland created resentment that led to the English Civil War. He sponsored the King James Bible.

James I

n
1. (Biography) called the Conqueror. 1208–76, king of Aragon (1216–76). He captured the Balearic Islands and Valencia from the Muslims, thus beginning Aragonese expansion in the Mediterranean
2. (Biography) 1394–1437, king of Scotland (1406–37), second son of Robert III
3. (Biography) 1566–1625, king of England and Ireland (1603–25) and, as James VI, king of Scotland (1567–1625), in succession to Elizabeth I of England and his mother, Mary Queen of Scots, respectively. He alienated Parliament by his assertion of the divine right of kings, his favourites, esp the Duke of Buckingham, and his subservience to Spain
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Noun1.James I - the first Stuart to be king of England and Ireland from 1603 to 1625 and king of Scotland from 1567 to 1625James I - the first Stuart to be king of England and Ireland from 1603 to 1625 and king of Scotland from 1567 to 1625; he was the son of Mary Queen of Scots and he succeeded Elizabeth I; he alienated the British Parliament by claiming the divine right of kings (1566-1625)
Stuart - the royal family that ruled Scotland from 1371-1714 and ruled England from 1603 to 1649 and again from 1660 to 1714
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In chapter 5 of De Iureiurando, I find that Innocent III judges to be invalid the oath by which James the Conqueror, king of Aragon, bound himself for a considerable time to preserve the debased money that his father, Peter II, had minted.
One is the recently discovered 1244 surrender treaty of Jativa to King James the Conqueror (1208-76), which survives in fragmentary form with only half its interlinear Arabic-Latin text intact.
James the Conqueror, king of the federated kingdoms of Aragon and Catalonia, meanwhile, came from a dynasty that had long claimed the right to conquer down the coast as far as Murcia.