James-Lange theory


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James-Lange theory

(ˈdʒeɪmzˈlɑːŋɡə)
n
(Psychology) psychol a theory that emotions are caused by bodily sensations; for example, we are sad because we weep
[named after William James + Carl Lange (1834–1900), Danish psychologist]
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the James-Lange theory, we do not tremble because we are scared, but rather we are scared because we tremble.
The James-Lange theory was challenged in the 1920's by Walter Cannon (1927).
(1927), "The James-Lange Theory of Emotions: A Critical Examination and an Alternative Theory", American Journal of Psychology, 39: 106-24.