James-Lange theory

(redirected from James-Lange theory of the emotions)

James-Lange theory

(ˈdʒeɪmzˈlɑːŋɡə)
n
(Psychology) psychol a theory that emotions are caused by bodily sensations; for example, we are sad because we weep
[named after William James + Carl Lange (1834–1900), Danish psychologist]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Following the near-universal abandonment in the twentieth century of the James-Lange theory of the emotions, which posits that emotion is a response to (rather than a cause of) physiological changes, scholars have suggested a range of possible relationships between reason and emotion.