Jameson Raid


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Jameson Raid: Second Boer War

Jameson Raid

(ˈdʒeɪmsən)
n
(Historical Terms) an expedition into the Transvaal in 1895 led by Sir Leander Starr Jameson (1853–1917) in an unsuccessful attempt to topple its Boer regime
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Harris' political career started in South Africa, where he became a member of the Cape Province House of Assembly, but it was marred by the Jameson Raid controversy - under the instruction of businessman Cecil Rhodes, he sent a message to the Times newspaper falsely suggesting Jameson was responding to an immediate request for help.
JAMESON RAID Wednesday August 17, Robin 2, Bilston, 01902 401211 * THE Midlands metal godfathers return for a handful of selected shows during which they'll be playing all the fan favourites.
Birmingham bands Voodoo Johnson, Raven Vandelle and Jameson Raid also appear tomorrow.
Rhodes proceeded to help on God's purpose of bringing "peace, liberty and justice" through the Matabele wars, the Jameson Raid, the Boer War, the subjection, first of the northern negroes and then of the Boers, to British domination, and the creation of a vast system of political corruption both in England and in South Africa.
The invasion and rule of Egypt (1882-1954), ostensibly to straighten out a bankrupt administration and protect the Suez Canal; the Jameson Raid (1895), conspiratorially devised to aid the "oppressed" British incomers to Boer territory and shift control of the Transvaal from the Dutch to the British; the rule of Nigeria (1900) to protect British trade all of these proved to be laboratories for perfecting the techniques of domination.
The Fort started its life as a jail but was converted to a defensive structure at the time of the Jameson raid at the end of 1895.
Public disgrace - Oscar Wilde's affair with Alfred Douglas being the most notable example - is an essential theme in Manly Pursuits, and Wills flees from his when Cecil Rhodes, himself disgraced by his encouragement of the 1895 Jameson Raid, hires him to bring English birds to South Africa for the sake of their singing, which Rhodes believes will prolong his life.
The angle of the book is intriguing and makes a refreshing change from yet another rehash of Rhodes versus Kruger, Chamberlain and the Jameson Raid, Milner versus the Boer republics, Black Week, Mafeking and all the rest.
The notion that Cecil Rhodes, an exemplar of late-nineteenth century imperial arrogance and aggression, derived enthusiastic political support from Cape Afrikaners up until -- and even after -- the disastrous 1895-6 Jameson Raid, confounds that highly ethnicized vision of South African history which regards exclusivist Afrikaner nationalism as the inevitable consequence of a constantly meddling and often rapacious British imperialism.
But I do like the outfits I wear as Jameson, who actually rode out on his Jameson Raid wearing a polka dot tie.
Marsh tracks carefully and critically the various political controversies that have made Chamberlain's career a minefield of controversies for historians: notably, his responsibility for the 1886 split of the Liberal party; his role, if any, in the political ruin of Sir Charles Dilke and Charles Stewart Parnell, and his culpability for the Jameson Raid and the coming of the Boer War.
In southern Africa, the British were still feeling the bad results of the Jameson raid.