Jane Jacobs


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Noun1.Jane Jacobs - United States writer and critic of urban planning (born in 1916)
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Some subjects explored include cityscapes imagined by Sigmund Freud and Jane Jacobs, applying Thomas Paine's idea of public participation to digital citizenship, protecting the digital commons, and Frantz Fanon's theories of freedom.
Inspired by the late urban activist and writer, Jane Jacobs, Janes Walk is a free, citizen-led, annual event that encourages residents to discover and connect with their communities.
Jane Jacobs was indeed a real activist at the time, and Lenny Bruce was a famous comedian as well.
A dynamic entrepreneur and visionary leader, Mrs Olamide Alabi- Jacobs, also the Chief Executive Officer of Jane Jacobs, has said the urge to become self-dependent ignited her dumping her bank job for a fashion business after five weeks without resignation.
This echoes what journalist and urban activist Jane Jacobs wrote almost three decades before.
IN HER 1992 book Systems of Survival, Jane Jacobs described the opposing impulses that inform the activities of government and commerce.
In 1971, Jane Jacobs stepped over the wide white front porch at 69 Albany Avenue in Toronto's Annex neighbourhood for the first time, having recently moved from New York City, where she had grown famous as the "housewife who changed the world." Jacobs moved to Canada because she was worried her sons would be drafted into the U.S.
The attractiveness of older neighborhoods has been a key planning mantra since at least the days of Jane Jacobs and her battles to preserve Greenwich Village from the wrecking ball.
Walking in the City with Jane: A Story of Jane Jacobs
The renowned urbanist Jane Jacobs, in her book 'The Death and Life of Great American Cities', made the vital economic point that, while old businesses can often afford to pay to be in new buildings, new businesses can only use old buildings which have already amortised their capital cost and are cheap to rent.
The renowned urbanist Jane Jacobs, in her book The Death and Life of Great American Cities, made the vital economic point that, while old businesses can often afford to pay to be in new buildings, new businesses can only use old buildings, which have already amortised their capital cost and are cheap to rent.
Summary: Cities, the American-Canadian author Jane Jacobs once observed, are engines for national prosperity and economic growth.