Janjaweed

(redirected from Janjawid)

Janjaweed

(ˈdʒænˌdʒəwɪd) or

Janjawid

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an armed tribal militia group in the Darfur region of western Sudan
[Arabic: a man with a horse and a gun]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
Janjawid
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In another coincidence, Frawley recognised 22-year-old migrant Abdurahman, whose father had saved her life before being killed by the dreaded Janjawid militia which is accused of war crimes.
But it is imprudent to declare that it "emerged from the womb of the armed forces" and contribute to the Sudanese economy without making it clear that the wealth source of the Janjawid leader is his master on the gold of Jabal Amer, which smuggles and sells on the black market in the Emirates as the children of Sudan sell in the Gulf markets.
The source pointed out that the daily violations and missile and artillery bombardments and other violations are coming only by the forces of aggression and mercenaries, especially as they are a mixture of mercenaries and multiple factions and non-disciplined elements of criminality, including al-Qaeda elements, Janjawid, EAU and Saudi soldiers and for this violation continues unceasingly.
He said in a statement to SUNA that the battle lasted for five hours after which the rebels escaped leaving behind them their dead who included the three commanders Mohamed Janjawid, Ali Kida and Mohamed Oru.
A year ago heavily-armed Sudanese poachers linked to the Janjawid militia crossed into Cameroon on horseback and butchered up to 450 elephants.
Hussein, six suspects, dont le president soudanais Omar el-Bechir et le chef de milice janjawid Ali Kosheib, sont actuellement poursuivis dans le cadre de l'enquete de la CPI sur le genocide au Darfour.
Since the crisis in the Darfur region began in 2003, the name Janjaweed (also spelled as Janjawid, Janjawad, Jingaweit, Jinjaweed) has become a very familiar name to many in the international community.
The UN Security Council authorised the creation of Unamid, set up to police the conflict in Darfur between the government, rebels and state-backed militias known as the Janjawid.
More often, however, we will encounter what Henry Shue has aptly called "waves of duty." Supposing that we have a right to be free from poverty or hunger, the responsibility for making good on these rights will rest in the first instance on us or our parents, who should be working for our living; if local conditions (drought, Janjawid militia, political corruption) make it impossible for us to provide for our own needs, then it might be the responsibility of our local, state, or national government.
The response of the NIF was to allow the janjawid to implement a policy of ethnic cleansing that by 2006 had left 3.5 million people in need of assistance (315).
Accordingly, instead of being held responsible for empowering and financing the Janjaward to do its bidding in Darfur, the government is simply accused of not doing enough to reign in the renegade Janjawid. Indicative of this is the fact that the government's use of its own officially recognised troops and military equipment in perpetrating the violence is rarely mentioned.
In its most recent issue, Al-Ahale independent weekly newspaper blamed the Saudi Special Committee, chaired by Emir Sultan Bin Abdulaziz, for establishing and funding what it described as the "Janjawid Army," hinting at the prospective popular army.