Janjaweed

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Related to Janjawiid: Janjaweed

Janjaweed

(ˈdʒænˌdʒəwɪd) or

Janjawid

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an armed tribal militia group in the Darfur region of western Sudan
[Arabic: a man with a horse and a gun]
Translations
Janjawid
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References in periodicals archive ?
The resolution also imposed an arms embargo on nonstate actors in Darfur and threatened sanctions against the GoS if it did not disarm the janjawiid as it had pledged to do in the Annan-Bashir Joint Communique.
The topics include Deby's international counterfeiting operation revealed, deadly betrayal in the oil fields of Sidegui, the birth of the Janjawiid, the voiceless children, the International Criminal Court, and a proposition for peace in Darfur and the sub-region.
Her four children lost their mother to this silent killer; they had already lost their father a few years ago at the hands of the Janjawiid.
Ali Haggar, "The Origins and Organization of the Janjawiid in Darfur," in War in Darfur and the Search for Peace, ed.
Haggar, "Origins and Organization of the Janjawiid," 113-14.
43) The Commission of Inquiry subsequently concluded that although the GoS and janjawiid forces were responsible for serious violations of international human rights and humanitarian law amounting to crimes under international law, "the Government of Sudan has not pursued a policy of genocide.
Long neglected conflicts in Darfur first exploded in February 2003, when the newly formed Sudan Liberation Movement (SLM) launched guerrilla raids on government garrisons, and the government responded with its well-tested counter-insurgency tool of unleashing its militia--in this case the Janjawiid, drawn from Darfur's indigenous Arabs.
For example, Julie Flint and Alex de Waal in Darfur: A Short History of a Long War (2005) note that in "October 2002, government-supported Janjawiid from the camps in South Darfur launched a major offensive, the first of its kind against Fur civilians" (page 64).
Pushing hard into Jebel Marra as far as Quila, the Janjawiid have been able to penetrate through the defenses of the mountain and deep into rebel held territory.
Moreover, I took pains to trace the origins of Arab supremacism in Darfur to Libya and Chad, and from there to some elements in the Janjawiid.
As of today, this research shows that in urban areas such as Nyala, prices for staple goods have risen substantially in local markets, rents are sky high (comparable with Western rental prices), aid levels are dropping and the Janjawiid are free to prey on the inhabitants of IDP camps with impunity.