Jansenism

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Jan·sen·ism

 (jăn′sə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The theological principles of Cornelis Jansen, which emphasize predestination, deny free will, and maintain that human nature is incapable of good. They were condemned as heretical by the Roman Catholic Church.

Jan′sen·ist n.

Jansenism

(ˈdʒænsəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church the doctrine of Cornelis Jansen and his disciples, who maintained that salvation was limited to those subject to a supernatural determinism, the rest being destined to perdition
2. (Roman Catholic Church) the religious movement arising from these doctrines
ˈJansenist n, adj
ˌJansenˈistic, ˈJansenˌistical adj

Jan•sen•ism

(ˈdʒæn səˌnɪz əm)

n.
the doctrinal system of Cornelis Jansen, denying free will and maintaining that human nature is corrupt and that Christ died for the elect and not for all people: condemned as heretical by the Catholic Chruch.
[1650–60; < French jansénisme]
Jan′sen•ist, n.
Jan`sen•is′tic, Jan`sen•is′ti•cal, adj.

Jansenism

a Christian sect founded by Cornelius Jansen, 17th-century Dutch religious reformer. See also heresy.
See also: Religion
a heretical doctrine of the 17th and 18th centuries denying free-dom of the will, accepting absolute predestination for part of mankind and condemnation to hell for the others, and emphasizing puritanical moral attitudes. — Jansenist, n., adj.
See also: Heresy

Jansenism

A Catholic sect, latterly centered on the Port Royal lay convent in Paris, which denied free will and promoted austerity and church reform. Condemned by Pope in 1713, the ensuing controversy split the French church.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jansenism - the Roman Catholic doctrine of Cornelis Jansen and his disciples; salvation is limited to those who are subject to supernatural determinism and the rest are assigned to perdition
theological doctrine - the doctrine of a religious group
Translations

Jansenism

[ˈdʒænsəˌnɪzəm] Njansenismo m
References in classic literature ?
This young girl belonged to an exceeding devout family, whose views of Catholicism were due to the spirit of a sect improperly styled Jansenists, which, in former times, caused troubles in France.
However it was, these insignificant disputes gave rise to two parties in the Gallican Church--the Jansenists and the Jesuits.
Yes," replied Conrart, "you have logic, but you are a Jansenist.
Readers who have a solid understanding of the conflict between Jesuits and Jansenists will find fresh perspective here, while those who have never heard of Jansenism will learn enough to follow Prest's arguments.
We meet personalities in various relations to the Jansenist controversies: Christian Lupus (1611-1681) and Enrico Noris (1631-1704), two Augustinian Eremites; Fabio Chigi, apostolic nuncio in Cologne (1639-1651) and the future Alexander VII; and Sebastian Knippenberg, Dominican inquisitor in Cologne (1693-1733), a "victim of the anti-Jansenists" (407).
Some neighbors who were Jansenists came to visit and help him.
Above all, there was the persistent opposition from the Jansenists of his time, whose moral rigidity and pessimism about the human condition John Baptist resisted vehemently all his life.
In Societes secretes, her third chapter, Baron describes Balzac's France as exceptionally rich in secret societies, including the Freemasons, the Jansenists, the orders of Knights Templar and Hospitaller, the Charbonnerie, the Rosicrucians, and the Congregation, but she also shows the writer's intensely personal attraction to the dreams of altruism, brotherhood, intimacy, and collective power evoked by his own fictional secret societies.
32) Although Diderot alludes in the novel to the polemics that opposed the Jansenists and Jesuits, he doesn't construct Suzanne as a member of either camp.
In 1651 the Church authorities moved against the Jansenists and shut down the Port Royal convent.
They have adopted not the theology, but the spiritual disposition of the great enemy of the Jesuits in the 17th and 18th centuries, the Jansenists.
One of the most revelatory influences on Schutz was the importance of the "spirit of Port-Royal," the community of seventeenth-century French Jansenists that included such figures as Pascal.