katana

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ka·ta·na

 (kə-tä′nə)
n.
A long, single-edge sword for use with two hands, traditionally worn by samurai.

[Japanese, from Old Japanese : kata, opposite side, one (of a pair) + na, blade.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

katana

(kəˈtɑːnə)
n
(Fencing) a long, curved single-edged sword traditionally used by Japanese samurai
[C18: Japanese]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
Katana
katana
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