Japanism


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Japanism

1. devotion to or preference for the customs, policies, language, or culture of Japan.
2. anything peculiar to or characteristic of Japan or its people.
See also: Japan
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
(57) Christopher Reed, "Modernizing the Mikado: Japan, Japanism and the Limitations of the Avant-Garde," Visual Culture in Britain 14 (2013): 68-86 (74).
(8.) Kumiko Sato in "How Information Technology Has (Not) Changed Feminism and Japanism: Cyberpunk in the Japanese Context" (2004) argues in a similar vein against the universalizing tendency of cyberfeminism on the grounds of the movement's location within the western social context, which in its celebration of postmodern fragmentation and posthuman ethos presupposes an existence of an traditional humanist individual self in need of subversion.
"How Information Technology Has (Not) Changed Feminism and Japanism: Cyberpunk in the Japanese Context." Comparative Literature Studies 41.3 (2004): 335-55.
Ivinski's inclusion of newly discovered or infrequently discussed Cassatt works is helpful to the specialist: Young Woman with a Mandolin (1876) is used to trace the artist's evolution from her study of Spanish painters such as Velazquez and Murillo to Impressionism, while Young Women Picking Fruit (1892) is described as a synthesis of Japanism, Post-Impressionism, and the early Italian Renaissance.
The phrase "Japanese spirit," which appeared in the 1930s, reflected this borrowed German model: "The words 'Japanism' and 'Emperor System' created [by the bureaucracy] at this time [Showa] had no connection to Japanese myth or Japanese psychology, but instead were just the Japanese version of German ideology." (71) Reflecting on this situation in 1962, Nyozekan wrote:
(9.) "Kokutai no hongi," in Japan 1931-1945: Militarism, Fascism, Japanism?, ed.
(8) Sato, "How Information Technology Has (Not) Changed Feminism and Japanism: Cyberpunk in the Japanese Context," Comparative Literature Studies 42:3 (2004): 340; Chun, "Orienting Orientalism," 15.
the banner of new Japanism but in deference to U.S.
Another rampant Japanism that interestingly survives unchallenged in Korean linguistic scholarship is concealed in the statement that "the Korean word for 'loanword' is oylay-e" (p.
On the contrary, we are promised an effort to divest Japan of some of many wrappings in which "Japanism" [cf.
Part of the joyousness must be explained with reference to the congruence between the subject--trees in blossom--and one of the standard motifs of Japanese art, for it was one of his hopes, confided to his brother, Theo, "that looking at nature under a bright sky might give us a better idea of the Japanese way of feeling and drawing." Japanism was a constant spiritual possiblity for him: one of the self-portraits deliberately presents his shaved and bony head as that of "a simple bonze worshipping the Eternal Buddha," and many of the late landscapes show the unmistakable angles and proportions of depictions by Hokusai or Hiroshige of bridges or roadways or rivers.
There are many other Japanisms among Chinese medical terms.