japonaiserie


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japonaiserie

(ˌdʒæpəˈnɛzəˌriː)
n
a style of art or decoration that is influenced by, or reflects, Japanese styles
References in periodicals archive ?
He regarded it as "a nice parody of the Chinese way" and saw no need for the English to "affect Chinoiserie." (5) He went even further in his position against any kind of chinoiserie or japonaiserie, Western or Eastern, as he warned against any Asian artist (Japanese or Chinese) wishing to go Europe to study and imitate European arts but inevitably ending up only producing Typhoon, a japonaiserie, (6) The Yellow Jacket, or some other piece "with an Eastern coat on its back, something which is like a penny peep-show for our stupid grown up children." (7)
Two works in the show are focused on the subject: 'Cherry Blossoms' with the exotic charm of Japonaiserie and the infectious pop joviality of the Japanese anime.
Such influence, which predates the Leach-Hamada popularisation of mingei, gave rise to the elegantly refined japonaiserie of the late-19th century.
Other--in my opinion less sophisticated--texts include Jay McInerney's Ransom full of machismo and japonaiserie (Vincent Van Gogh's nineteenth-century notion about the influence of Japanese art and culture), Clive James's comedy Brrm Brrm, or Alan Booth's and Richard Gordon Smith's travel writings (on travel and Japan, see, e.g., Goebel; Kawakami; Suvin; on the problematics between the literatures of the East and the West, see, e.g., Aldridge; Moore and Moody).
(12) Six Alabastra films are held at the George Eastman House: Messter Alabastra #1: Pierrot und Colombine; Messter Alabastra #2: Pierrot und Pierrette; Messter Alabastra #3: Salome; Messter Alabastra #4: Can-can; Messter Alabastra #5: Japonaiserie; Messter Alabastra #6: Apachentanz.
Paintings of velvet-swaddled damsels, with fiery hair and mournful pouts, fraternized with blue-and-white china, japonaiserie costumes, and gilt-edged tomes of illustrated fairy tales in "The Cult of Beauty: The Aesthetic Movement 1860-1900." Plush rooms (decorated with projections of peacock feathers and wispy, floral patterns) traced the movement's various phases.
This was at the height of the French enthusiasm for japonisme, and de Waal writes very well about both the commercial and the aesthetic sides of this craze: "Japanese things carried an air of eroticized possibility they were props for dressing up, role playing, the sensuous reimagining of the self." Appropriately, Charles Ephrussi shared his passion for japonaiserie with his mistress, Louise Cahen d'Anvers, a married woman from another Jewish business dynasty.
exposure to Asian culture via the decoration crazes of Chinoiserie and Japonaiserie that swept both western Europe and the United States, such stories helped instigate fears that a "Yellow Peril" was infiltrating private domestic spaces.
The techniques of Japanese prints infused French art with new vitality, and these artists believed it was their duty to protect it from becoming 'japonaiserie" (Berger 1992, 43).
He puts Taut in the context of earlier "Japanophilia" in the West, when the collecting of japonaiserie (woodblock prints, samurai helmets, folding screens, etc.) became popular and influential in Europe and America.
Cutting back on the customary Japonaiserie trivia, the peach blossoms in particular, he has instilled a certain vitality, a tonic brilliance.
The other day I was thinking of Ashton's magical wisp of a ballet Madame Chrysantheme, an exquisite piece of theatrical Japonaiserie, as delicate as a consummately crafted ivory fan, but now broken, totally lost in time.