Jat

(redirected from Jat people)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Jat people: JAAT

Jat

 (jät)
n.
A member of a peasant caste residing in the Punjab and other areas of northern India and Pakistan, comprising Muslim, Hindu, and Sikh groups.

[Hindi jāṭ, from Middle Indic *jaṭṭa-; probably akin to Sanskrit Jartikaḥ, name of a tribe.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Jat

(dʒɑːt)
n, pl Jat or Jats
(Peoples) a member of an Indo-European people widely dispersed throughout N India
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Jat

(dʒɑt, dʒɔt)

n.
a member of an agricultural caste or cluster of castes of the Punjab, Haryana, and adjacent parts of NW India and Pakistan.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jat - a member of an Indo-European people widely scattered throughout the northwest of the Indian subcontinent and consisting of Muslims and Hindus and SikhsJat - a member of an Indo-European people widely scattered throughout the northwest of the Indian subcontinent and consisting of Muslims and Hindus and Sikhs
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
But then we can see a much more ancient trace of these Jat people, and they in the 2,200 BC, that is 4,200 years ago, find mention as the conquerors of the last of the Gutian kings.
He narrates how uprisings broke out amongst peasants and zamindars (proprietary rent receivers) against Mughal taxation policy and how these uprisings eventually were transformed into an open challenge of the empire and the erosion of imperial control over the region that allowed Badan Singh to form his kingdom at Bharatpur and consolidate power amongst the Jat people. Distributed in the US by South Asia Books.