Jatropha


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jatropha

(ˈdʒætrəfə)
n
any plant of the genus Jatropha, esp the poisonous shrub Jatropha curcas, originating in Central America but also found in Asia and Africa; used mainly as a component for biofuel
[from Greek iatros physician + trophē nourishment]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jatropha - a mainly tropical genus of American plant belonging to the family EuphorbiaceaeJatropha - a mainly tropical genus of American plant belonging to the family Euphorbiaceae
rosid dicot genus - a genus of dicotyledonous plants
Euphorbiaceae, family Euphorbiaceae, spurge family - a family of plants of order Geraniales
Jatropha curcus, physic nut - small tropical American tree yielding purple dye and a tanning extract and bearing physic nuts containing a purgative oil that is poisonous in large quantities
References in periodicals archive ?
Findings of studies on conversion of non-edible oils (such as castor, neem and jatropha) and used cooking oil into biodiesel and its characterisation was also highlighted during the event and it was pointed out that non-edible seed crops could be cultivated on marginal land in the country to produce biodiesel fuel.
Summary: Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was applied based on central composite rotatable design (CCRD) to optimize transesterification reaction parameters for obtaining optimal biodiesel yield from Jatropha curcas oil.
Seeds of jatropha (Jatropha curcas) are used worldwide to produce biodiesel and the oil extraction generates a high amount of waste called seed cake.
The genus Jatropha belongs to the Euphorbiaceae family and the plants of this genus are widely distributed around the world with approximately 186 species (FRESNEDO-RAMIREZ & OROZCO-RAMIREZ, 2013).
Jatropha curcus is a member of Euphoiaceae family and widely cultivated in many tropical and subtropical regions, such as China, Africa, India, and South East Asia, because of its high oil content [2].
The genus Jatropha (Euphorbiaceae) consists of 175 species distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world (Webster, 1994).
The selected vegetable oils were coconut oil, jatropha curcas oil, and sunflower oil.
Jatropha plant is a multipurpose drought resistant shrub, a native to tropical America but thrives in Africa, Asia and other tropical and subtropical countries.