Rhys

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Rhys

 (rēs), Jean Originally Ellen Gwendolen Rees Williams. 1890-1979.
West Indian-born British writer known for Wide Sargasso Sea (1966), a novel based on the character of the first Mrs. Rochester in Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre.

Rhys

(riːs)
n
(Biography) Jean (Ella Gwendolen Rees Williams). ?1890–1979, Welsh novelist and short-story writer, born in Dominica. Her novels include Voyage in the Dark (1934), Good Morning, Midnight (1939), and Wide Sargasso Sea (1966)
References in periodicals archive ?
Gregg makes a more nuanced but similar claim in her book Jean Rhys's Historical Imagination; she identifies a dialectical tension between the text's recruitment/obliteration of blacks and Rhys's acute critical awareness of the workings of colonialist discourse (1995, 38): ".
Since their "resurrection" from literary obscurity in 1966, Jean Rhys's novels and stories have been approached from a variety of critical viewpoints.
One finds this with other women modernists as well: Jean Rhys, H.
Naipaul, Sylvia Wynter, Jean Rhys, Derek Walcott, and Erna Brodber, she contends that madness is a significant aspect of the Caribbean aesthetic that functions as both a critique of colonialism and a commentary on precarious nation building.
Isherwood, George Orwell, Padraic O Conaire, and, of course, Jean Rhys.
Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea is a product of the modern postcolonialism and the use of language she does represents her extraordinary ability to subvert the ideologies of the West, deconstructing the European discourse and monocentrism.
The title of this exhibition is a quote from an Emily Dickinson poem and is inspired by the Jean Rhys novel of the same name, about a middle-aged English woman returning to Paris after a long absence.
Stet is a must-read for the literarily curious, who will revel in Athill's portraits of such great literary figures as Jean Rhys, V.
01446 THEATRE A Woman Alone in the City Writings by Albuequerque based musician and theatre maker Marya Errin Jones, Jean Rhys, Rosamund Lehmann and Cardiff based artist Rhiannon Lowe.
Plock's chapters on Edith Wharton, Jean Rhys, Rosamond Lehmann, Elizabeth Bowen, and Virginia Woolf address their relationship to fashion, the marketplace, and questions of dress.
Jean Rhys is so drunk as to seem heroically so (she gets stuck in her toilet bowl); Sonia Orwell is self-importantly dramatic (the helpful crone); Germaine Greer is magnificently virile (but has ugly feet).
NYT Syndicate In the annals of literary treachery, there is a special place reserved for David Plante and his memoir Difficult Women, a portrait of three of his friends (or so they believed): novelist Jean Rhys; feminist writer Germaine Greer; and Sonia Orwell, George's widow, who presided, in her depressive fashion, over London's bookish set in the 1970s.