Barrault

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Barrault

(French baro)
n
(Biography) Jean-Louis (ʒɑ̃lwi). 1910–94, French actor and director, noted particularly as a mime
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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On June 4, 1942, the day before he was due to leave France for wartime exile in Tunis, French writer Andre Gide agreed to a lunch invitation from young actor and director Jean-Louis Barrault. They had recently collaborated on an adaptation of Shakespeare's Hamlet, and Barrault now wanted Gide to write a script based on Kafka's The Trial (Der Prozess).
Jean-Louis Barrault: [beaucoup moins que]Je vois une lueur dans vos yeux[beaucoup plus grand que]
Ne le 2 aout 1935 a Rabat, Hamidou Benmessaoud a debute sa carriere artistique au theatre en France aux cotes de Madeleine Renaud et Jean-Louis Barrault dans Les Paravents de Jean Genet en 1961.
Another echo reverberated in my mind as I spent time with a stack of VHS tapes of Marcel Marceau teaching acting and mime students in the U.S.: Didn't the actor Jean-Louis Barrault, also a student of Decroux, reject his teacher's definitive assertion that mime should be silent?
Finally abandoning figurative art, but knowing that the strictures of the tradition of Arabic calligraphy were not for him, he set out on a different journey." He collaborated with actor Guy Jacquet, actor and director, Jean-Louis Barrault, and later with oud musician Fawzy Al Aiedy, to create a performance of music, poetry and calligraphy projected onto a large screen.
The graceful movements of the models bring to mind Rudolf Nureyev's dancing at the peak of his career, and they speak through an eloquent silence that connects them to the mime artistry of Marcel Marceau or Jean-Louis Barrault. The dreamy atmosphere in many of Irwin's works is redolent of Monet's landscapes, while the representation of a single figure simultaneously from several points of view echoes the cubist art of Picasso or Braque.
Pic is loaded with wonderful talking-head interviews with the spry, urbane Dominique, who bears a remarkable resemblance to the great French actor Jean-Louis Barrault. Amid the tension and constant uncertainty of his position, he expresss a join de vivre and irreverence hat's completely disarming and undermines any polemical harshness.
Between the months of August and December he contributed fifty articles to Le Figaro, including several denouncing the "epuration," the term given by the Resistance to the merciless persecution of "collaborators." In spite of this agitation, he finished a play, Les Mal-Aimes, about two sisters in love with the same man, produced by Jean-Louis Barrault.