Democratic-Republican Party

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Democratic-Republican Party

n.
A political party in the United States that was opposed to the Federalist Party and was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1792 and dissolved in 1828.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Democratic-Republican Party

n
(Historical Terms) US history the antifederalist party originally led by Thomas Jefferson, which developed into the modern Democratic Party
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Democrat′ic-Repub′lican Par`ty


n.
a U.S. political party opposed to the Federalist Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1792.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Democratic-Republican Party - a former major political party in the United States in the early 19th century; opposed the old Federalist party; favored a strict interpretation of the constitution in order to limit the powers of the federal government
party, political party - an organization to gain political power; "in 1992 Perot tried to organize a third party at the national level"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
senator and first mayor of Worcester, but in 1806 he was just another ambitious politician linked to the Jeffersonian Republican Party. His father had even been appointed President Thomas Jefferson's first attorney general, and had been much criticized by prominent Worcester worthies, including Isaiah Thomas, publisher and editor of the Spy.
The era of what has come to be called "Founders Chic," of mass sales of ponderous, pedestrian doorstops about the likes of John Adams and Alexander Hamilton, as well as of similarly unenlightening works on lesser lights such as John Jay, Gouverneur Morris, and other politicians of the Early Republic, proceeds apace; and so one cannot much blame Nancy Isenberg or Viking for wanting to tap into the market--despite the fact that Burr was not a founder, in any obvious sense, of anything other than the Jeffersonian Republican Party that nearly drove him to his doom.
In the North, these middling sorts came to make up a substantial proportion of the Jeffersonian Republican party, in opposition to the gentry-dominated Federalist party.