Jensenism

Jensenism

the belief that blacks are mentally inferior to whites, based on results of intelligence tests that failed to account for such differences as test questions slanted in favor of whites, lack of cultural and educational oppor-tunities among blacks, etc. — Jensenist, n., adj.
See also: Race
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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What became known as "Jensenism" has resurfaced every few years, in books such as Charles Murray and Richard Herrnstein's The Bell Curve (1994) and the journalist Nicholas Wade's A Troublesome Inheritance (2014).
Heritability and racism: A Marxist critique of Jensenism. New York: International Publishers.
Today, we have a new 'Jensenism' in the form of Twf, a project funded by the Welsh Language Board to promote Welsh language skills in the very young (Western Mail, March 3).
Like Vietnam and Watergate, it is a contemporary symptom of serious affliction." Jerry Hirsch, Jensenism: The Bankruptcy, of "Science" Without Scholarship, 25 EDUC.
The Pioneer Fund was drawn into the "Jensenism" (246)
(4.) "Jensenism" even became a dictionary-defined term.
Though "Jensenism" is a term listed in several dictionaries, Arthur Jensen has produced a more extensive body of work than suggested by the dictionary entry.
Jensenism, described as one of the great heresies of 20th century science, continued to inspire heated debate at the London School of Economics for the next two years, culminating in a physical assault on Professor Eysenck when he came to give us a lecture in 1973 on "The Biological Basis of Intelligence." I was more than just a horrified witness to this `political action' by a dozen Maoists (proudly sporting red Mao-Tse Tung badges in their lapels).
Jensenism is redefined, not in terms of his notions about the genetics of intelligence, but in terms of the personal qualities and beliefs that have made Jensen a researcher of note: going against convention, tackling controversial topics with empiricism, refusing to be intimidated by threats and picket lines, and being flexible enough to modify his beliefs.
The above view of Jensenism differs, in all likelihood, from other contributors here.
A new definition of Jensenism, based on the Jansenist heresy, is provided.