Jephthah

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Jeph·thah

 (jĕf′thə)
In the Bible, a judge of Israel who vowed to sacrifice to God the first thing to come out of his house to greet him upon his return, in exchange for victory over the Ammonites. He was victorious and, upon returning home, was met by his only child, a daughter.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Jephthah

(ˈdʒɛfθə)
n
(Bible) Old Testament a judge of Israel, who sacrificed his daughter in fulfilment of a vow (Judges 11:12–40). Douay spelling: Jephte
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Riches are mine, fortune is in my hand; They whom I favour thrive in wealth amain, While virtue, valour, wisdom, sit in want." To whom thus Jesus patiently replied:-- "Yet wealth without these three is impotent To gain dominion, or to keep it gained-- Witness those ancient empires of the earth, In highth of all their flowing wealth dissolved; But men endued with these have oft attained, In lowest poverty, to highest deeds-- Gideon, and Jephtha, and the shepherd lad Whose offspring on the throne of Juda sate So many ages, and shall yet regain That seat, and reign in Israel without end.
Jephtha, the new production this season, is based on an Old Testament story from The Book of Judges.
l Oswestry are without South African all-rounder Roswen Jephtha for today's trip to Albrighton in the Shropshire Premier League.
"Oratorio" is a notoriously slippery term, applied at different times to works as diverse as Giacomo Carissimi's Jephtha in the seventeenth century, the English oratorios of George Frideric Handel in the eighteenth, Felix Mendelssohn's Elijah and Charles Gounod's Redemption in the nineteenth, and William Walton's Belshazzar's Feast and Michael Tippett's The Mask of Time in the twentieth.
At Beehive Stores we found two: one was of the walk by the brook with the bee hollow, near the church and the overhanging yew, where I had read Jephtha.
There's a rare chance to see a staged version of Handel's oratorio Jephtha on Thursday.
But the beauty, emotion and sheer excitement of Jephtha kept me riveted to the end -actually 45 minutes earlier than originally advertised.
Handel's oratorio "Jephtha," featuring soprano Elizabeth Keusch and tenor James Taylor.
They are bringing Wagner's ghostly tale to the Hippodrome in March, along with revivals of Mozart's Marriage of Figaro and Handel's Jephtha.
Mark Padmore, the dazzling young tenor who has already gained many admirers in the Midlands, returns to Symphony Hall on Saturday, singing the title role in Handel's Jephtha.
I was some paces behind, carrying Jephtha. The sun, shining through the lower branches of the yew, made a flickering tracery on the open page: Scenes of horror, scenes of woe...
Handel's Jephtha freely reworks the Old Testament story (warrior offers sacrifice to secure victory and unwittingly condemns daughter) to provide both a happy ending (death sentence commuted to lifelong celibacy) and heightened personal tragedy, through an extended family of non-Biblical characters.