Jephthah


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Jeph·thah

 (jĕf′thə)
In the Bible, a judge of Israel who vowed to sacrifice to God the first thing to come out of his house to greet him upon his return, in exchange for victory over the Ammonites. He was victorious and, upon returning home, was met by his only child, a daughter.

Jephthah

(ˈdʒɛfθə)
n
(Bible) Old Testament a judge of Israel, who sacrificed his daughter in fulfilment of a vow (Judges 11:12–40). Douay spelling: Jephte
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I remember when puppet-shows were made of good scripture stories, as Jephthah's Rash Vow, and such good things, and when wicked people were carried away by the devil.
I should note that Rashi assumed that Jephthah sacrificed his daughter.
The Judge Jephthah is not able to control a very similar situation after his victory over Ammon.
The rest are Godwin Omoaka, Emeka Ozoani, Alexander Ejesieme, Jephthah Njikonye, Alhassan Umar and Oyetola Muyiwa.
class="MsoNormalVillage elder Jephthah Gacibu said he had been preparing to go to his farm when he was informed of the brutal killing.
The Epistle of Paul to the Hebrews, chapters 11 to 12, recounts a Homer-like catalog of heroes from Abraham and Moses to the likes of Rahab, Samson and Jephthah and concludes, "since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us [...] run with endurance the race set before us" (Heb.
After the AGM, there will be a talk by Professor Richard Roberts - Daughters of Jephthah, Tessa Ransford and Scottish women's poetry in the borderland between patriarchy and feminist theory.
(44) The story is recounted in the book of Judges (11:29-40), where one reads of a judge named Jephthah who led a military expedition against one of Israel s nemeses, the Ammonites.
Such women's welcomes to their men include the celebration with a bitter end with which Jephthah's daughter welcomed her father home (Judg.11:32-34) and the celebration of David's victories over the Philistines (I Sam.
Yet these heroic portraits are overshadowed by more bleak and memorable ones: Jephthah's victim daughter, Samson's treacherous Delilah, and the nameless concubine at Gibeah whose fate reads like a horror script.
They are the story of Jephtha's daughter in Judges 11:29-40 (within the Jephthah cycle Judges 10:6-12:7), the Samson narrative in Judges 13-16, and the Saul cycle in 1 Samuel.
Judge Jephthah makes an impulsive oath, and judge Samson is a muscle-bound dullard who commits hari-kari.