Society of Jesus

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Society of Jesus

n.
A Roman Catholic order of regular clergy, founded by Saint Ignatius of Loyola in 1534, that is strongly committed to education, theological scholarship, and missionary work.

Society of Jesus

n
(Roman Catholic Church) the religious order of the Jesuits, founded by Ignatius Loyola

Jes•u•it

(ˈdʒɛʒ u ɪt, -yu ɪt, ˈdʒɛz-)

n.
1. a member of a Roman Catholic religious order for men (Society of Jesus) founded by Ignatius of Loyola in 1534.
2. (often l.c.) a crafty, intriguing, or equivocating person.
[1550–60; < New Latin Jēsuita= Latin Jēsu(s) + -ita -ite1]
Jes`u•it′i•cal, adj.
Jes`u•it′i•cal•ly, adv.
Jes′u•it•ism, Jes′u•it•ry, n.

Society of Jesus

(Jesuits) A Catholic missionary and teaching order founded in 1534 by Ignatius Loyola, a Spanish soldier. Military in discipline and often controversial.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Society of Jesus - a Roman Catholic order founded by Saint Ignatius of Loyola in 1534 to defend Catholicism against the Reformation and to do missionary work among the heathen; it is strongly committed to education and scholarship
monastic order, order - a group of person living under a religious rule; "the order of Saint Benedict"
Jesuit - a member of the Jesuit order
Translations

Society of Jesus

nCompagnia di Gesù
References in classic literature ?
Near its southern termination, it received the contributions of another lake, whose waters were so limpid as to have been exclusively selected by the Jesuit missionaries to perform the typical purification of baptism, and to obtain for it the title of lake "du Saint Sacrement." The less zealous English thought they conferred a sufficient honor on its unsullied fountains, when they bestowed the name of their reigning prince, the second of the house of Hanover.
Built between 1747 and 1750, at a time when Tadoussac was an active centre in the fur trade, the church bears witness to the relationship between the fur trade, the Jesuit missionaries and First Nations.
The Jesuit missionaries crossed rough seas, mountains and rivers on foot to baptize and preach Christianity and minister to the sick.
He speaks warmly of Jesuit missionaries such as Matteo Ricci and Roberto de Nobili, who sought to adapt the gospel message to the unique cultures of China and India.
Lots of compelling stories are also recounted, from the Dutch stealing charts from the Portuguese during the days of competition in east Asia, to Jesuit missionaries producing maps and globes to impress their Chinese hosts.
Osterhammel shows how major figures such as Leibniz, Voltaire, Gibbon, and Hegel took a keen interest in Asian culture and history, and introduces lesser-known scientific travelers, colonial administrators, Jesuit missionaries, and adventurers who returned home from Asia bearing manuscripts in many exotic languages, huge collections of ethnographic data, and stories that sometimes defied belief.
The parish was given to the care of Jesuit missionaries upon their arrival in the St.
Klein as well as Kamel went beyond the usual limits required for the Jesuit missionaries of their times, for they both understood that scientific research is something of high importance in promoting Christian values.
Lopez and Thupten explain that scholasticism was the paradigm "of all the great Jesuit missionaries in Asia" (p.
Even though Yaquis defeated Spanish forces on several occasions, a faction chose to invite Jesuit missionaries to live among them in 1610.
As early as the seventeenth century, French Jesuit missionaries began planting apple seeds throughout the Michigan wilderness.
The house is seen to live another chapter as it continues retelling its past from that moment it was constructed by Chinese artisans, to serving as the headquarters of Jesuit missionaries before their expulsion from Spanish territories, to surviving fire and bombings during the Second World War when it was used by the USAFFE (United States Armed Forces in the Far East) as its headquarters, down to its current status as a museum.