Jewess

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Jew·ess

 (jo͞o′ĭs)
n. Offensive
A Jewish woman or girl.

Jewess

(ˈdʒuːɪs)
n
(Judaism) often offensive a Jewish girl or woman

Jew•ess

(ˈdʒu ɪs)

n. Older Use: Usually Offensive.
(a term used to refer to a Jewish girl or woman.)
usage: See -ess.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jewess - a woman who is a JewJewess - a woman who is a Jew      
Jew, Hebrew, Israelite - a person belonging to the worldwide group claiming descent from Jacob (or converted to it) and connected by cultural or religious ties
Translations
jødinde
jødinne
judinna

Jewess

[ˈdʒuːɪs] N (o.f., gen pej) → judía f

Jewess

nJüdin f

Jewess

[ˈdʒuːɪs] n (offensive) → ebrea
References in periodicals archive ?
Only a handful of Jewesses who were married to Ceylonese Burghers, Sinhalese and Malays, remained on the Island.
L'hitraot (see you soon), fellow Jewesses -- or as my phone would try to make me say instead, "Hit raptors!"
A 'bad' word, like syphilis, will immediately conjure up other images like 'street walkers' on account of poverty through Versailles, for, of course, all street walkers are 'Jewesses,' 'because they have no shame.' 'Jewish' will nearly always be the last link, pronounced or not, in his litany of dark words.
But among undzerer, our kind, Jews and those who get us, I think there's a place for "Jewess." There's a time for a dad to say, referring to his daughters, "Nope, no sonsjust four little Jewesses." Or for a fan of Broad City to say, "Those are two hilarious Jewesses." Or to say, as an old roommate and I used to, when trying to figure out if a woman at a party was undzere, "Is she a 'wess?" The word is having a modest moment, one that I have occasionally, one that I have occasionally helped along in print.
For example, Brice's "Becky from Babylon," about a New York Jewess who learned to shake it like an "Oriental," parodied both the exotic Jewesses and ghetto girls that Brice frequently portrayed (177).
Rosenbaum and her colleagues at the Jewish Women's Archive operate one called Jewesses With Attitude.
From Felicie Bernstein, who imported French Impressionism to Berlin, to Berta Zuckerkandl, journalist-midwife of the Vienna Secession; from Ada Leverson and Genevieve Straus, who reigned over Belle Epoque aesthetes in London and Paris, to Gertrude Stein and her Cubists; from the Stettheimer sisters in New York to Salka Viertel's emigre circle in Hollywood, vivacious Jewesses fertilized the flowers of modern culture with conversation and contacts.