Jewish American Princess


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Jewish American Princess

n
slang US an American Jewish girl of a prosperous family, regarded as being typically pampered and spoilt. Abbreviation: JAP
References in periodicals archive ?
We were lucky to be joined by Odd Mom Out's Jill Kargman, Broadway legend Tovah Feldshuh, and Jewish Women's Archive director Judith Rosenbaum at the Marlene Meyerson JCC Manhattan last week for a lively discussion and debate about the Jewish American Princess stereotypeits origins, implications, and cultural staying power.
The Reader speaks to Lieberman's "red-phone moment"--not the aesthetic impurities of lowbrow culture (a la a very dead Greenberg), but capitalism and its dotty offspring, the try-hard consumer--exemplified by Thorstein Veblen's pecuniary emulation, i.e., the Jewish American Princess who buys a Coach purse at twelve only to learn about Prada a year later, flipping through magazines while waiting for her mother at the hair salon.
We might trace the emergence of the Jewish American Princess as a cultural touchstone and stereotype back to a two-hour episode of the local television series The David Susskind Show in October 1970.
really doesn't fit the usual Jewish American princess
I was the typical Jewish American Princess who didn't have to do anything to earn her crown.
Jewish women: the Jewish Mother and the Jewish American Princess.
On the other, Mollie's mostly deplorable actions throughout the film present the modern Jewish woman as immature, selfish, materialistic, and aggressive (presaging the "Jewish American Princess" of the later twentieth century).
Critics branded that comment as racist and offensive and even Davies admitted that 'she went a little crazy with her references to JAPs an acronym for Jewish American Princess'.
Sarah Silverman's Jewish American Princess stand-up routine has got America all of a flutter - as she serves up ironically racist material with a sweet smile.
An entire chapter on Fran Drescher and The Nanny relates the 1990s comedy to a spate of literature on feminist and post-feminist notions of "masquerade" and dressing up, and to expositions on the "Jewish American Princess" canard related to general theories of cultural understanding of the woman's body.
(As for Grace as a radical depiction of Jewish femininity--if it is radical to embody the stereotype of a Jewish American Princess: cannot cook, materialistic, not as polished as the goy girls but can laugh at herself, then Grace is radical.) I have not worked, marched, protested and stood up for gay rights so that people can call themselves liberal for watching the gay equivalent of Amos 'n' Andy.
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