Jewish calendar


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Related to Jewish calendar: Yom Kippur, Hebrew Year

Jewish calendar

n.
The lunisolar calendar used to mark the events of the Jewish year, dating the creation of the world at 3761 bc. See Table at calendar.

Jewish calendar

n
(Judaism) the lunisolar calendar used by the Jews, in which time is reckoned from 3761 bc: regarded as the year of the Creation. The months, Nisan, Iyar, Sivan, Tammuz, Av, Elul, Tishri, Cheshvan, Kislev, Tevet, Shevat, and Adar, have either 29 or 30 days. Originally a new month was declared when the new moon was sighted in Jerusalem, but when this became impossible, a complex formula was devised to keep Rosh Chodesh near to the new moon. In addition, to keep the harvest festivals in the right seasons, there is a Metonic cycle of 14 years, in five of which an additional month is added after Shevat. The year according to biblical reckoning begins with Nisan, and the civil year begins with Tishri; the years are numbered from Tishri. Also called: Hebrew calendar See also Adar

Jew′ish cal′endar


n.
a calendar used by Jews, as for determining religious holidays, that is reckoned from the traditional date of the Creation (corresponding to 3761 b.c.).
[1885–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jewish calendar - (Judaism) the calendar used by the Jews; dates from 3761 BC (the assumed date of the Creation of the world); a lunar year of 354 days is adjusted to the solar year by periodic leap years
Judaism - the monotheistic religion of the Jews having its spiritual and ethical principles embodied chiefly in the Torah and in the Talmud
lunisolar calendar - a calendar based on both lunar and solar cycles
Jewish calendar month - a month in the Jewish calendar
Tishri - the first month of the civil year; the seventh month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in September and October)
Heshvan - the second month of the civil year; the eighth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in October and November)
Chislev, Kislev - the third month of the civil year; the ninth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in November and December)
Tebet, Tevet - the fourth month of the civil year; the tenth month of the ecclesiastical year (in December and January)
Shebat, Shevat - the fifth month of the civil year: the eleventh month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in January and February)
Adar - the sixth month of the civil year; the twelfth month of the ecclesiastic year in the Jewish calendar (in February and March)
Adar Sheni, Veadar - included seven times in every 19 years
Nisan, Nissan - the seventh month of the civil year; the first month of the ecclesiastic year (in March and April)
Iyar, Iyyar - the eighth month of the civil year; the second month of the ecclesiastical year (in April and May)
Sivan, Siwan - the ninth month of the civil year; the third month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in May and June)
Tammuz, Thammuz - the tenth month of the civil year; the fourth month of the ecclesiastic year (in June and July)
Av, Ab - the eleventh month of the civil year; the fifth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in July and August)
Ellul, Elul - the twelfth month of the civil year; the sixth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in August and September)
References in periodicals archive ?
10-11), marked on the Jewish calendar as a day to mourn the destruction of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem.
Tisha B'Av is considered the saddest day in the Jewish calendar because it reminds Jews of the destruction of their temple "and other calamities." According to Jewish tradition, the temple was destroyed 20 centuries ago in the year 70 AD.
Bennett High School and would have headed to the final round but for the students' religious observance and MYLaw's inability to change the date of the championship, which fell within the final days of Passover, a time of rest on the Jewish calendar.
At first, Christians used the Jewish calendar to set the days of their holidays, with Easter falling out on the first Sunday after the 15th of the Hebrew month of Nisan.
In 325 AD the Council of Nicaea decided to establish rules for the date of Easter, independent of the Jewish calendar, so that all Christians would celebrate at the same time.
The holiday begins with "Fast of Esther" during the 13th day of the month of Adar (the 12th month in the Jewish calendar) in memory of the fast imposed by the queen upon herself, on the servants, and on all the Jews of the city of Susa.
Billed as the most joyous date on the Jewish calendar, the daylong holiday commemorates the nullification in 356 BC of a Persian decree calling for the extermination of the Jewish people throughout the Persian Empire, as told in the biblical Book of Esther.
Shavuot is the secret gem of the Jewish calendar: a festival that's all about strong women, wheat harvests, creamy cheesecakes, and receiving the Torah.
It said Jewish groups have called for breaking into Al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem on May 13, when Israel marks its occupation of East Jerusalem based on the Jewish calendar.
As the Jewish calendar is a lunar calendar, there are times when Eastern Orthodox Easter and Western Easter (based on the Gregorian calendar) do in fact coincide but not in general.
However the First Council of Nice in 325AD, decreed that Christians should no longer use the Jewish calendar. Easter should be celebrated on a Sunday, the day of the resurrection.

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