Jewish calendar


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Jewish calendar: Yom Kippur, Hebrew Year

Jewish calendar

n.
The lunisolar calendar used to mark the events of the Jewish year, dating the creation of the world at 3761 bc. See Table at calendar.

Jewish calendar

n
(Judaism) the lunisolar calendar used by the Jews, in which time is reckoned from 3761 bc: regarded as the year of the Creation. The months, Nisan, Iyar, Sivan, Tammuz, Av, Elul, Tishri, Cheshvan, Kislev, Tevet, Shevat, and Adar, have either 29 or 30 days. Originally a new month was declared when the new moon was sighted in Jerusalem, but when this became impossible, a complex formula was devised to keep Rosh Chodesh near to the new moon. In addition, to keep the harvest festivals in the right seasons, there is a Metonic cycle of 14 years, in five of which an additional month is added after Shevat. The year according to biblical reckoning begins with Nisan, and the civil year begins with Tishri; the years are numbered from Tishri. Also called: Hebrew calendar See also Adar

Jew′ish cal′endar


n.
a calendar used by Jews, as for determining religious holidays, that is reckoned from the traditional date of the Creation (corresponding to 3761 b.c.).
[1885–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jewish calendar - (Judaism) the calendar used by the Jews; dates from 3761 BC (the assumed date of the Creation of the world); a lunar year of 354 days is adjusted to the solar year by periodic leap years
Judaism - the monotheistic religion of the Jews having its spiritual and ethical principles embodied chiefly in the Torah and in the Talmud
lunisolar calendar - a calendar based on both lunar and solar cycles
Jewish calendar month - a month in the Jewish calendar
Tishri - the first month of the civil year; the seventh month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in September and October)
Heshvan - the second month of the civil year; the eighth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in October and November)
Chislev, Kislev - the third month of the civil year; the ninth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in November and December)
Tebet, Tevet - the fourth month of the civil year; the tenth month of the ecclesiastical year (in December and January)
Shebat, Shevat - the fifth month of the civil year: the eleventh month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in January and February)
Adar - the sixth month of the civil year; the twelfth month of the ecclesiastic year in the Jewish calendar (in February and March)
Adar Sheni, Veadar - included seven times in every 19 years
Nisan, Nissan - the seventh month of the civil year; the first month of the ecclesiastic year (in March and April)
Iyar, Iyyar - the eighth month of the civil year; the second month of the ecclesiastical year (in April and May)
Sivan, Siwan - the ninth month of the civil year; the third month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in May and June)
Tammuz, Thammuz - the tenth month of the civil year; the fourth month of the ecclesiastic year (in June and July)
Av, Ab - the eleventh month of the civil year; the fifth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in July and August)
Ellul, Elul - the twelfth month of the civil year; the sixth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in August and September)
References in periodicals archive ?
Our novel identification strategy derives from the fact that while the school entry law in Israel determines a fixed cutoff date every year according to the Jewish calendar, since the Jewish lunar year is about eleven days shorter than the solar cycle, in different years this cutoff date is mechanically converted into different Gregorian cutoff dates.
In Israel, they will celebrate the coming of 5778 year according to the Jewish calendar.
Passover [Jewish festival] fell on the date of the paschal full moon in the Jewish calendar, and the Last Supper [Holy Thursday] occurred on the Passover.
With My Jewish Year, she goes farther than synagogue membership and a Hanukkah plan, exploring eighteen holidays on the Jewish calendar, from the jewel of Shabbat to the lesser-known holidays of Shemini Atzeret and the fast of Esther on Purim.
Their topics include traversing the 49th parallel: the Canadian Jewish experience prior to 1867, planting the seed of identity: the contributions of the early Jewish farmers of North America, they who control the time: the Orthodox Alliance of Abraham de Sola and Jacques Judah Lyons and the 19th-century Jewish calendar, finding a rabbi for Quebec City: the interplay between an American yeshiva and a Canadian congregation, and east meets west: Sephardic and Mizrahi Jews in Canada and the US.
Rather, the Karaite Jews of America will be celebrating the first day of the seventh month of the Jewish calendar, a day of sacred assembly called for in Leviticus 23:24.
The April 7 cyber-attacks were first launched in 2013 and that year timed to coincide with the eve of Holocaust Remembrance Day in the Jewish calendar.
Chapter one introduces the Biblical Jewish calendar and explains the prophetic significance of the Biblical feasts in the overall plan of God.
So, we owe the fact that it skips around the year, not to the pagans but to an ancient Jewish calendar, based on the phases of the moon.
This came after Israeli authorities decided to deny Muslim worshippers access into the Mosque while allowed Jewish settlers to force their way into it from Wednesday 10am to Thursday 10am purportedly for celebrating the first of September according to the Jewish calendar.
According to the Jewish calendar, Jerusalem Day falls on Saturday May 16, however, the Jewish Shabat (day of rest) on Saturday has forced the postponement of the occasion to Sunday.

Full browser ?