Jidda


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Jidda: Djeddah

Jid·da

or Jid·dah  (jĭd′ə) or Jed·dah (jĕd′ə)
A city of west-central Saudi Arabia on the Red Sea, ruled by the Turks until 1916. It is a port used by Muslim pilgrims making the journey to Mecca.

Jid•da

(ˈdʒɪd də)

also Jedda



n.
the seaport of Mecca, in W Saudi Arabia, on the Red Sea. 1,500,000.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jidda - port city in western Saudi Arabia on the Red SeaJidda - port city in western Saudi Arabia on the Red Sea; near Mecca
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Saudi Arabia - an absolute monarchy occupying most of the Arabian Peninsula in southwest Asia; vast oil reserves dominate the economy
References in periodicals archive ?
Borno government representative Jidda said the attackers were suspected to be members of the Islamist militant group Boko Haram.
The same scenario is repeating itself now," said Marouane Jidda, one of the organisers.
Any communication and transaction with the IDB entities were so far carried out from Jidda, Saudi Arabia, or from the IDB representative office in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
At this very moment," Alhaji Baba Ahmad Jidda, the secretary to the Borno state government, told The Independent newspaper last week, "most parts of Borno state are being occupied by Boko Haram insurgents.
The problem this year was that there were many more pilgrims than the airlines could possibly handle, despite the fact that each of these travelers, including the octogenarian Iranian, had purchased an airline ticket to Jidda before leaving their home country.
US Department of State, secret airgram from US diplomat in Jidda to US Secretary of State, 1 September 1948, State Dept.
Perhaps the only reason she is able to speak out, do her work, and actually create this dialogue is that she is living in Haifa and not Gaza, Nablus, Damascus, Jidda, Amman, Cairo, Tehran, or Basra.
See also Dulles to Embassy in Jidda, 27 August 1957, RG 59, 683.
Borno state government secretary Baba Ahmed Jidda announced the curfew in a statement but gave no further details about the attack.
State government secretary Baba Ahmed Jidda called for calm, disclosing that only emergency service vehicles were allowed to move during the curfew, which would be lifted "as soon as the situation improves".
SECTO 1 Action Khartoum, Brussels & Beirut, 25 June 1974, as repeated in State 139021 to Jidda, 27 June 1974]
Saudi King Fahd assured a succession of visitors to the royal palaces in Riyadh and Jidda that Saddam was a changed man, a new moderate who could be trusted to act responsibly even if he was a tad violent.