Arbuthnot

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Ar·buth·not

 (är-bŭth′nət, är′bəth-nŏt′), John 1667-1735.
Scottish physician and writer noted for his satirical anti-Whig pamphlets published as Law Is a Bottomless Pit (1712) and later retitled The History of John Bull.

Arbuthnot

(ɑːˈbʌθnɒt)
n
(Biography) John. 1667–1735, Scottish physician and satirist: author of The History of John Bull (1712) and, with others, of the Memoirs of Martinus Scriblerus (1741)

Ar•buth•not

(ɑrˈbʌθ nət, ˈɑr bəθˌnɒt)

n.
John, 1667–1735, Scottish author and physician.
References in periodicals archive ?
John Arbuthnot reminded us centuries ago, "All political parties die at last of swallowing their own lies." Or as Groucho Marx put it more recently, "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies."
As the Scottish mathematician and physician John Arbuthnot wrote in a book in 1731, "Asparagus affects my urine with a fetid smell."
Which character, who first appeared in a 1712 pamphlet by John Arbuthnot, is the personification of England?
In the words of John Arbuthnot, the author of The Art of Political Lying (not Swift, as was once thought): "The Translatory is a Lye that transfers the merit of a man's good action to another who is in himself less deserving." The sum of those succeeding "translatories" will, however, slowly tend towards the original work, while at the same time enhancing it.
Despite his small stature, Ulrich had an immensely loud voice, almost deafening enough to 'endanger the Royal Palace' at full volume, as Jonathan Swift or possibly John Arbuthnot observed in the satirical poem It Cannot Rain but it Pours (1726).
Other authors involved with Curll, and usually embroiled in conflicts with him, include John Arbuthnot, Jane Barkel, Susanna Centlivre, Colley Cibber, John Dennis, John Gay, Delarivier Manley, John Oldmixon, and Laetitia Pilkington.
Dreadnought" ( a reference to the First Sea Lord John Arbuthnot 'Jackie' Fisher, who chaired the committee which gave the go ahead for the revolutionary battleship Dreadnought.