John of Damascus

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John of Damascus

n
(Biography) Saint. ?675–749 ad, Syrian theologian, who defended the veneration of icons and images against the iconoclasts. Feast day: Dec 4
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John Damascene, an early Church Father and a Doctor of the Church, "Sts.
Among the Church Fathers, he favors Jerome, John Chrysostom, Gregory the Great, and John Damascene. Leo Elders provides this insight: "During the time of the Fathers the dominant thought was a mixture of Platonism and Stoicism with some influence of Gnosticism.
His topics include the commentaries on the works of Aristotle, Gnosticism and Neoplatonism: philosophy in the first centuries and Gnosis, the commentaries on two treatises of Boethius, the metaphysics of the Liber de causis, Saint John Damascene and Saint Anselm of Canerbury, Islamic philosophy: Avicenna and Averroes, and Jewish philosophy: Avicebron and Maimonides.
John Damascene stressed the irrevocable character ot the demonic rejection ot Oods friendship, rather than any supposed defect in Divine Mercy, as that which makes the sin of the fallen angels unforgivable.
The two approaches do not always converge as fruitfully as they might, but at least we have decisively moved on in the world of Western theological scholarship from an attitude to icons that is shaped by a few quotations from John Damascene and a slightly mystified respect.
The Orthodox prelate spoke today at the inauguration of the work of the Council of Antioch at the Institute Saint John Damascene in Balamand.
This quotation from St John Damascene (675-749) appropriately describes the theological focus of the Christian Faith and the Earth Conference: Respice et Prospice, which was held 6-10 August 2012 at the Sustainability Institute near Cape Town in South Africa.
There was some very interesting work done, from John Damascene through Peter the Venerable and later, which hasn't really been repeated.
John Damascene: Tradition and Originality in Byzantine Theology.
John Damascene says that God gave the Jews the Sabbath because of their "grossness and sensuality" and "absolute propensity for material things.
4), he did concede to John Damascene that wonder (admiratio) and amazement (stupor) can be species of fear, adding that they are to the intellect what sloth is to the body, though according to Park "he differentiated between wonder and amazement just enough to save Aristotle's basic point" (113).