John Day River


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John Day River

A river, about 450 km (280 mi) long, of north-central Oregon flowing west and north to the Columbia River.
References in periodicals archive ?
A raucous travel alarm shocked us awake near a rain forest, but where the drift boat dumped into the John Day River that morning we were surrounded by sagebrush, wheatgrass, and Indian paintbrush in a high desert commonly known as the Oregon Outback.
The second study area is the John Day River basin in northeastern Oregon, which encompasses 8,010 square miles.
Our trap captured a significant number of large adult lampreys, perhaps because of a downstream movement of spawned-out anadromous fish similar to that observed in the John Day River in Oregon for L.
OREGON officials expect to increase slightly the number of California bighorn tags and add a nonresident tag to the John Day River No.
This paper will describe the results of a three-year cooperative project (1999-2001) in two sub-watersheds of the John Day River basin.
There were rumors that some fine specimens of pseudomesolite (later discredited when it was determined to be mesolite) had been discovered in connection with some road improvement along the Middle Fork of the John Day River just east of Ritter Hot Springs.
The Middle Fork is a major tributary to the North Fork John Day River, which has the largest remaining run of wild salmon in the Columbia River Basin.
These tracts of public land would provide recreational access and views to Sutton Mountain, the Painted Hills and John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, and additionally connect to the Wild and Scenic John Day River.
Army Corps of Engineers had removed the treacherous rocks below the mouth of John Day River. In 1893, work began on a lock to bypass the Columbia's Cascades (now drowned beneath the Bonneville Lock and Dam).
North Fork John Day River (5 miles, easy) - Follow the Wild and Scenic North Fork John Day River on a trail to a place called the "Bigfoot Hilton" on a five-mile out-and-back hike.
Location-wise, give the prize to the John Day River in Oregon for smallies, and Saskatchewan's Last Mountain Lake for walleye.
The authors present a case study that analyzes the impact of habitat investments on salmonids abundance using biological, hydrologic, and economic models estimated for the John Day River basin in central Oregon, where substantial habitat investments to improve anadromous fish production are under way.