Faust

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Faust

 (foust) also Faus·tus (fou′stəs, fô′-)
n.
A magician and alchemist in German legend who sells his soul to the devil in exchange for power and knowledge.

[German, after Johann Faust (1480?-1540?), German magician and alchemist.]

Faust′i·an (fou′stē-ən) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Faust

(faʊst) or

Faustus

n
(European Myth & Legend) German legend a magician and alchemist who sells his soul to the devil in exchange for knowledge and power
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Faust

(faʊst)

also Faus•tus

(ˈfaʊ stəs, ˈfɔ-)

n.
a magician in medieval German legend who sold his soul to the devil in exchange for knowledge and power.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Faust - an alchemist of German legend who sold his soul to Mephistopheles in exchange for knowledgeFaust - an alchemist of German legend who sold his soul to Mephistopheles in exchange for knowledge
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Faust

[faʊst] NFausto
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
HISTORY MASHED UP: At Southwest Shakespeare Company in Mesa, Ariz., David Davalos's Tom Stoppard-esque Wittenberg imagines college debates among Hamlet, John Faustus, and Martin Luther (Feb.
One play that ardently asserts man's ontology is Mickle Maher's An Apology for the Course and Outcome of Certain Events Delivered by Doctor John Faustus on His Final Evening, first produced in 1996.
"No mortal can express the pains of hell" (5.1.47), the Old Man reminds Faustus, echoing the source text, The Damnable Life and Deserved Death of Doctor John Faustus (1592): "Hell is bloodthirsty, and is never satisfied." (42)