John of Austria


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John of Austria

Known as Don John. 1547-1578.
Bavarian-born Spanish general who commanded the fleet that defeated the Turks at the Battle of Lepanto in the Gulf of Corinth (1571) and captured Tunis (1573).

John of Austria

n
(Biography) called Don John. 1547–78, Spanish general: defeated the Turks at Lepanto (1571)
References in classic literature ?
It was known as a fact that the Most Serene Don John of Austria, natural brother of our good king Don Philip, was coming as commander-in-chief of the allied forces, and rumours were abroad of the vast warlike preparations which were being made, all which stirred my heart and filled me with a longing to take part in the campaign which was expected; and though I had reason to believe, and almost certain promises, that on the first opportunity that presented itself I should be promoted to be captain, I preferred to leave all and betake myself, as I did, to Italy; and it was my good fortune that Don John had just arrived at Genoa, and was going on to Naples to join the Venetian fleet, as he afterwards did at Messina.
Siloe, which has painstakingly replicated manuscripts such as the 16th century Bestiary of John of Austria and the 10th century Beato Emilianense will soon release 898 exact replicas of the mysterious text.
Very few Australians would know who Don John of Austria was and why he might be regarded as important enough to have an opera written about him and yet in the nineteenth century he was a well known figure in history.
Those who visited William's famous riding house in Antwerp included Europe's magnates such as Don John of Austria.
If there is a climactic moment here, it is the battle of Lepanto, in which the Tuscan fleet again fought side-by-side with the Spaniards, led then by Don John of Austria.
This navy represented the Christian League, an ad-hoc coalition of Catholic monarchies, ducal kingdoms, and Italian republics under the command of 25-year-old Don John of Austria.
The opera, Don John of Austria, was performed at the Spitalfields Festival, with Mackerras providing the orchestration (the opera survives only in piano score) and Briger conducting.
Michel de Montaigne, for instance, uses this battle as an example of why we should not use earthly events as indicators of divine will: was a notable Sea-battle, which was lately gained against the Turkes, under the conduct of Don John of Austria.