John of Damascus


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

John of Damascus

n
(Biography) Saint. ?675–749 ad, Syrian theologian, who defended the veneration of icons and images against the iconoclasts. Feast day: Dec 4
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
John of Damascus and Islam: Christian Heresiology and the Intellectual Background to Earliest Christian-Muslim Relations
John of Damascus Orthodox Christian Mission Church in Carbondale with Father Tilemahos Alikakos officiating.
A source at Damascus Police Command told SANA that the two mortars landed near John of Damascus School in the neighborhood, adding that no casualties were reported but some cars parked in the area were damaged due to the attack.
15) In his authoritative eighth-century compendium of Greek patristic doctrine, John of Damascus affirmed the doctrine of creation from nothing.
1976), John of Damascus on Islam: The 'Heresy of the Ishmaelites, Lovaina.
This volume provides not only a range of essays on Grosseteste's writings and intellectual context, but also critical editions and translations of some little known texts, notably his De luce (edited by Cecilia Panti and translated by Neil Lewis), his rendering of The Dialogue of the Christian and the Saracen by John of Damascus (by Meridel Holland), and his Sermon 86 on The Ten Commandments (by Michael W Dunne).
The source said that the terrorists fired three mortar rounds which landed neat John of Damascus School and the Cross Church in al-Qasa'a, claiming one citizen's life and injuring another, in addition to causing considerable material damage to homes and parked cars.
The letters went on, "On the same day, John of Damascus School situated in the neighborhood Kasa'a was also subjected to a similar mortar attack, as the shell landed on a class row while the teacher was giving the lesson, killing 5 children and wounding 35 others, under the age of 10.
Others, such as John of Damascus, are not willing to attribute evil to God, so they work their way around it:
This she does via the study of church fathers John of Damascus, Gregory of Nyssa, Athanasius, Gregory of Nazianzus, and St.
In the first part, two authors analyze the contribution of two important theologians: John of Damascus and Gregory of Palamas.