John of Damascus


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John of Damascus

n
(Biography) Saint. ?675–749 ad, Syrian theologian, who defended the veneration of icons and images against the iconoclasts. Feast day: Dec 4
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References in periodicals archive ?
Damascus, SANA_ "Tree of Hope" is the title of operetta performed by the family of John of Damascus school in the hall of the Holy Cross church in Qasaa on Saturday evening.
John of Damascus: Christians and Muslims in Umayyad Times," Sidney Griffith discusses the possible impact of John of Damascus, a Melkite civil servant in the Umayyad government, on Christian thought and practice of his time.
John of Damascus: "Prayer is the raising of one's mind and heart to God or the requesting of good things from God."
John of Damascus and Islam: Christian Heresiology and the Intellectual Background to Earliest Christian-Muslim Relations
John of Damascus Orthodox Christian Mission Church in Carbondale with Father Tilemahos Alikakos officiating.
(15) In his authoritative eighth-century compendium of Greek patristic doctrine, John of Damascus affirmed the doctrine of creation from nothing.
This volume provides not only a range of essays on Grosseteste's writings and intellectual context, but also critical editions and translations of some little known texts, notably his De luce (edited by Cecilia Panti and translated by Neil Lewis), his rendering of The Dialogue of the Christian and the Saracen by John of Damascus (by Meridel Holland), and his Sermon 86 on The Ten Commandments (by Michael W Dunne).
The source said that the terrorists fired three mortar rounds which landed neat John of Damascus School and the Cross Church in al-Qasa'a, claiming one citizen's life and injuring another, in addition to causing considerable material damage to homes and parked cars.
Cecelia Panti gives a critical edition of De luce (in Latin with Latin notes); Neil Lewis translates the same text into English; Meridel Holland gives an edition and English translation of Grosseteste's translation of John of Damascus' Dialogue of the Christian and the Saracen; Michael W.
A helpful summary can be found in the work of Saint John of Damascus: "the phrase 'after His image' clearly refers to the side of [human] nature which consists of mind and free will, whereas 'after His likeness' means likeness in virtue so far as that is possible" (An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 2.12).