John of Salisbury


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John of Salisbury

n
(Biography) died 1180, English ecclesiastic and scholar; bishop of Chartres (1176–80). He supported Thomas à Becket against Henry II
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Today, 'sitting on the shoulders of (these) giants, we see more, and things that are more distant, than they did, not because our sight is superior or because we are taller than they, but because they raise us up, and by their great stature add to ours.' (John of Salisbury)
The Problem of Universals from Boethius to John of Salisbury
Many of the chapters base themselves on financial accounts, taxation records, and the like, but Stephen Rigby, in his examination of the wider justification for social inequality, looks at the works of John of Salisbury, Giles of Rome, and Christine de Pisan arguing that they all supported the need for hierarchy that underlies the structure of the rural and urban economy.
John of Salisbury's eclectic compendium of moral philosophy, personal reflection, court satire, and exegesis, the Policraticus, is a staple text in the history of European political thought.
In "Urban Bodies, Urban Souls" she draws on numerous instances of the civic body being described as a well-governed human body--as in John of Salisbury's Policraticus (p.
Essays cover liturgy and mythic history in The Marvels of Rome; the identity of the Eternal City through visual art, monumental inscription, and the Mirabilia; the Jewish experience of Rome in the 12th century; an assessment of the political symbolism of the City of Rome in the writing of John of Salisbury; Rome in Arabic and Persian Medieval literature; and an imagined city.
Francesco Caruso's "On the Shoulders of Grammatica: John of Salisbury's Metalogicon and Poliziano's Lamia" reminds us that pre-modern intellectual discourse usually had traceable roots, in this case in parallels between the Lamia and the works of John of Salisbury and Petrarch.
Diplomat and Bishop of Chartres John of Salisbury (d.
Antinarella and his wife Ann of Fitchburg; a daughter, Jessie Shaw and her husband John of Salisbury, MA; 11 grandchildren; 4 great grandchildren; nieces and nephews.
Watkins studies English chronicles from about 1050 to 1215: Orderic Vitalis, Walter Map, William of Malmesbury, Gervase of Tilbury, William of Newburgh, William of Poitiers, John of Salisbury, and Gerald of Wales, among others.
Reading this book, one feels unspoken arguments in the wings--Christine de Pizan, for instance, is only mentioned here a few times, and John of Salisbury not at all, but Wakelin's approach from readership habits and the history of print culture would further develop what Jeffery Richards and others have said about Christine's humanism, and what some political theorists have said about Salisbury.