Joule-Thomson effect


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Joule-Thomson effect

n
a change in temperature of a thermally insulated gas when it is forced through a small hole or a porous material. For each gas there is a temperature of inversion above which the change is positive and below which it is negative. Also called: Joule-Kelvin effect
[C20: named after James Prescott Joule and Sir William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Once C[O.sub.2] was entered from the well-head, it transported through the 780 m depth wellbore (Figure 2(a)) while experiencing thermal disequilibrium processes such as heat convection, conduction, frictional effect, and Joule-Thomson effect [21, 27].
One of the greatest advantages of using the GLG is to provide cooling from the natural Joule-Thomson effect when the pressure of a gas is reduced (like the cooling that happens when a can of spray reduces the pressure of its contents).
They are for calculating the Joule-Thomson effect due to a drop in pressures, designing a double-pipe heat exchanger, calculating batch heating and cooling, calculating metal temperature, and designing a distillation column using Smoker equations.
To ensure this, the sample is first suitably conditioned, for example with optimized pressure reduction (avoidance of ice formation by the Joule-Thomson effect) and filtering (separating out solid particles, possibly also a moisture trap).
Specifically, the isenthalpic expansion process across the orifice in the MGJT cycle can be characterized by the Joule-Thomson effect temperature change ([DELTA][T.sub.JT]).
The temperature of the air stream does not increase because of the Joule-Thomson effect. The mechanical energy is predominately frictional force in the stone mill, shearing force in the hammer mill, and shock force in the jet mill.