ghetto

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ghet·to

 (gĕt′ō)
n. pl. ghet·tos or ghet·toes
1. A usually poor section of a city inhabited primarily by people of the same race, religion, or social background, often because of discrimination.
2. An often walled quarter in a European city to which Jews were restricted beginning in the Middle Ages.
3. Something that resembles the restriction or isolation of a city ghetto: "trapped in ethnic or pink-collar managerial job ghettoes" (Diane Weathers).
adj. Slang
In a manner typical or stereotypical of an impoverished urban area, as in being makeshift, garish, or crass: "I pick up the pair of very big, very ghetto, door-knocker bamboo earrings" (Meesha Mink and De'nesha Diamond)."Isn't chewing gum when accepting an award very ghetto?" (Vibe).

[Italian, after Ghetto, island near Venice where Jews were made to live in the 16th century.]

ghetto

(ˈɡɛtəʊ)
n, pl -tos or -toes
1. (Sociology) sociol a densely populated slum area of a city inhabited by a socially and economically deprived minority
2. (Sociology) an area in a European city in which Jews were formerly required to live
3. (Sociology) a group or class of people that is segregated in some way
[C17: from Italian, perhaps shortened from borghetto, diminutive of borgo settlement outside a walled city; or from the Venetian ghetto the medieval iron-founding district, largely inhabited by Jews]

ghet•to

(ˈgɛt oʊ)

n., pl. -tos, -toes.
1. a section of a city, esp. a thickly populated slum area, inhabited predominantly by members of a minority group.
2. (formerly, in most European countries) a section of a city in which all Jews were required to live.
3. an environment to which a group has been relegated, as because of bias, or in which a group has segregated itself for various reasons: female job ghettos; a suburban ghetto for millionaires.
[1605–15; < Italian, orig. the name of an island near Venice where Jews were forced to reside in the 16th century < Venetian, literally, foundry (giving the island its name), n. derivative of ghettare to cast; see jet1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ghetto - formerly the restricted quarter of many European cities in which Jews were required to liveghetto - formerly the restricted quarter of many European cities in which Jews were required to live; "the Warsaw ghetto"
quarter - a district of a city having some distinguishing character; "the Latin Quarter"
2.ghetto - any segregated mode of living or working that results from bias or stereotyping; "the relative security of the gay ghetto"; "no escape from the ghetto of the typing pool"
life - a characteristic state or mode of living; "social life"; "city life"; "real life"
3.ghetto - a poor densely populated city district occupied by a minority ethnic group linked together by economic hardship and social restrictions
city district - a district of a town or city
Translations
جيتو
ghetto
ghetto
ghettofavelle
gettó
hverfi; fátækrahverfi
getas
getograustu rajons
geto

ghetto

[ˈgetəʊ] N (ghettos or ghettoes (pl)) → gueto m (Hist) → judería f

ghetto

[ˈgɛtəʊ] nghetto m
in the ghetto → dans le ghettoghetto blaster ngros radiocassette m

ghetto

n (lit, fig)G(h)etto nt

ghetto

[ˈgɛtəʊ] nghetto

ghetto

(ˈgetəu) plural ˈghetto(e)s noun
a (poor) part of a city etc in which a certain group of people (especially immigrants) lives. Large cities like New York have many ghettoes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Just around the corner in Judengasse is the Christmas and Easter store, closely followed by the Christmas in Salzburg shop, offering yearround shopping for all that glitters.
Some months from now, the DNA of Mayer Amschel Rothschildthe Rothschild family patriarch who rose from the squalid Judengasse of 18th century Frankfurt to install each of his five sons in one of five great banking capitals of Europe, with strict exhortations never to marry outside the faithwill be mingled with that of Conrad Hilton, a confirmed anti-Semite, according the sublime memoir by his most famous ex-wife, Zsa-Zsa Gabor (of which I believe every word as gospel).
EDICION DE 1923 EDICIONES DE 1943 Y 1954 Juderia JUDENGASSE Quejas que nunca cesan se alzan las paredes, anhelantes paredes Paredes tan escarpadas que han caido en lo profundo los hombres.
By the mid-15th century, this practice became formalized as cities started to compel Jews to move into a separate quarter, usually in the poorest section of town: Frankfurt's infamous Judengasse, for example, was established in 1460 by a city ordinance.
The Jewish Museum in Frankfurt with the locations Rothschild Palace and Museum Judengasse has give the task of Jewish history and culture from ancient times to the present.
In the Judengasse, they had been without honor and without rights; and when they left it, they ceased to be Jews.
Kasper-Holtkotte also traces Jewish migration to Frankfurt and offers a very helpful table of foreign Jews in the Judengasse in 1620,