Jugurtha

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Related to Jugurthine: Jugurtha, Massinissa

Jugurtha

(dʒuːˈɡɜːθə)
n
(Biography) died 104 bc, king of Numidia (?112–104), who waged war against the Romans (the Jugurthine War, 112–105) and was defeated and executed
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Gaius Sallustius Crispus, a Roman historian of the first century BC, wrote on the Catiline and Jugurthine wars.
The intellectual energy and theatrical skill required to conceive and carry out a brand-new dramatization, whether from an extant English translation of Sallust or from the original Latin, would have been considerable, for the Jugurthine history is a long, dense and detailed account of political maneuvering and military campaigning during the Roman Republic.
(7) Gareth Sampson, The Crisis of Rome: The Jugurthine and Northern Wars and the Rise of Marius, Pen and Sword Publishing (2010).
The major strength of Matthew's work is how he describes the Marian reforms as linked to specific military challenges, such as the Jugurthine and the German Wars.
Translation of Sallust: The Jugurthine war; the conspiracy of Catiline.
In Jugurthine War (translated by John Selby Watson), Chapter 91, the Roman historian Sallust calmly relates what the Roman army did after the town of Capsa surrendered without a fight:
(7) Born somewhere between AD 95 and 100 in the Roman colony of Cirta (8) in North Africa (famous for Sallust's description of its siege during the Jugurthine war), the young Fronto probably first studied in Alexandria and came to Rome at about the age of eighteen.
With such a prospect for personal glory, the rivalry between Marius and Sulla, which had simmered since the Jugurthine War more than a decade earlier, exploded into the open.
157-86 B.C.) began this change during the Jugurthine Wars in North Africa.
(22) In the classical world--which, in this context, started to decline already before the Jugurthine wars--social status was the reward of a painstaking process of individual discovery, whereby risk and uncertainty were not eliminated but acted as the instrument through which a man would acquire maturity and become a full member of the community.