Yule

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Related to Jule: julep, Joule

Yule

 (yo͞ol)
n.
Christmas or the Christmas season, especially as traditionally celebrated in Northern Europe and North America with customs stemming in part from pagan celebrations of the winter solstice.

[Middle English yole, from Old English geōl.]
Word History: Yule comes from Old English geōl, "Christmas Day, Christmastide." In the time before the Anglo-Saxons converted to Christianity, geōl was the name of a winter festival held sometime during the time of the year we would now call December. After their conversion, the Anglo-Saxons continued to use geōl as the name for the great Christian feast occurring at the same time, Christmas. Other pagan peoples speaking Germanic languages held similar festivals, and among the Norse, the winter festival was called jōl, using the Old Norse equivalent of Old English geōl. After the conversion of Scandinavia to Christianity, jōl was put to new use just as geōl had been in Great Britain, and the usual word for Christmas is still Jul in Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish, the descendants of Old Norse. The Anglo-Saxon church did not discourage this kind of reapplication of native Germanic words to the new Christian traditions emanating from the Mediterranean world, and today, several other Christian holidays have English names with Anglo-Saxon roots. Easter, for example, descends from Old English ēastre, which comes from the name of a springtime festival celebrated by the Anglo-Saxons' pagan ancestors to honor the goddess of the dawn. Lent comes from Old English lencten, originally meaning "spring" and related to the word long, since the days become longer in spring.

yule

(juːl)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) (sometimes capital) literary archaic or dialect
a. Christmas, the Christmas season, or Christmas festivities
b. (in combination): yuletide.
[Old English geōla, originally a name of a pagan feast lasting 12 days; related to Old Norse jōl, Swedish jul, Gothic jiuleis]

yule

(yul)

n.
Christmas, or the Christmas season.
[before 900; Middle English yole, Old English geōl(a), c. Old Norse jōl orig., a pagan festival held near midwinter; akin to Gothic jiuleis]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.yule - period extending from Dec. 24 to Jan. 6Yule - period extending from Dec. 24 to Jan. 6
Boxing Day - first weekday after Christmas
Jan, January - the first month of the year; begins 10 days after the winter solstice
Dec, December - the last (12th) month of the year
season - a recurrent time marked by major holidays; "it was the Christmas season"
Translations
Julfest

Yule

[juːl]
A. N (o.f. or liter) → Navidad f
B. CPD Yule log N (= wood) → leño m de Navidad; (= cake) → tronco m de Navidad

yule

n (old)Weihnachten nt, → Julfest nt; yule logJulblock m
References in classic literature ?
Monson now coming in, "did you pay for Jule's handkerchief?
When the King, with his gentlemen, entered the armory he was still smarting from the humiliation of De Montfort's reproaches, and as he laid aside his surcoat and plumed hat to take the foils with De Fulm his eyes alighted on the master of fence, Sir Jules de Vac, who was advancing with the King's foil and helmet.
His son Jules is with him--Jules, who wants to marry her.
Jules' my poor husband's name was Jules--`a footstool, please.' Saving your presence, gentlemen, it made me feel all-overish like.
Raoul Auguste Jules de Bragelonne, the true son of M.
you don't know Jules Landau, le fameux Jules Landau, le clairvoyant?
And Walter Merritt Emory won his desire of Michael against Doctor Masters; had his wife dine with him at Jules' that evening and took her to see Margaret Anglin in celebration of the victory; returned home at one in the morning, in his pyjamas went out to take a last look at Michael, and found no Michael.
The moon-faced youth (by name Jules Vanderkelkov, as I afterwards learnt) took the first sentence.
It is the name of Jean Priaulx, and the address is the Hotel Jules Priaulx, Paris.'
"Eh!" said the cardinal, sharply; "why had he not, as you have, a Jules Mazarin by his side?
This struck from all three allusions to Edgar Poe and Jules Verne, and such platitudes as naturally rise to the lips of the most intelligent when they are talking against time, and dealing with a new invention in which it would seem ingenuous to believe too soon; and the question of the telephone carried them safely back to the big house.
Jules has promised me a new omelet, on condition that we sit down at precisely half-past one.