Julian calendar


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Related to Julian calendar: Gregorian calendar, Julian date

Julian calendar

n.
The solar calendar introduced by Julius Caesar in Rome in 46 bc, having a year of 12 months and 365 days and a leap year of 366 days every fourth year. It was eventually replaced by the Gregorian calendar. See Table at calendar.

Julian calendar

n
(Historical Terms) the calendar introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 bc, identical to the present calendar in all but two aspects: the beginning of the year was not fixed on Jan 1 and leap years occurred every fourth year and in every centenary year. Compare Gregorian calendar

Jul′ian cal′endar


n.
the calendar established by Julius Caesar in 46 B.C., fixing the length of the year at 365 days and at 366 days every fourth year. There are 12 months of 30 or 31 days, except for February, which has 28 days with the exception of every fourth year, or leap year, when it has 29 days. Compare Gregorian calendar.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Julian calendar - the solar calendar introduced in Rome in 46 b.c. by Julius Caesar and slightly modified by Augustus, establishing the 12-month year of 365 days with each 4th year having 366 days and the months having 31 or 30 days except for February
solar calendar - a calendar based on solar cycles
References in periodicals archive ?
| September 2 THE Year was 1752 and this was the last day we would ever use the Julian calendar. The following morning, the Gregorian calendar was adopted, which we still use today.
Damascus, SANA- Upon the directives of President Bashar al-Assad, Presidential Affairs Minister Mansour Azzam on Sunday visited heads of Christian denominations that follow the Julian calendar, relaying the congratulations of President al-Assad on occasion of Easter.
In contrast, Orthodox Christians, including the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem, follow the Julian Calendar. Easter on the Julian Calendar this year falls on April 28.
1582: Pope Gregory XIII announced the new Gregorian calendar, replacing the Julian calendar. It was not adopted by Britain until 1752, when a "loss" of 11 days had to be made up.
In the Julian calendar, 10 days were added to the calendar year in various months, and February was increased every four years (leap year) to 29 days to coordinate the calendar year to the solar cycle of roughly 365.2425 days.
The 13-day gap is because Orthodox Christians follow the Julian calendar while majority of Christians, from other denominations, follow the modern day Gregorian calendar.
The Orthodox faithful who celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ under the Julian calendar today are celebrating this most important Christian holiday.
Summary: Julian calendar pre-dates the Gregorian calendar currently used by most Christians.
People welcome in the New Year with the fire ceremony which has ancient roots dating back to the 1750s, when the Julian calendar was reformed in Britain.
On November 6 and 7, 1917 (or October 24 and 25 on the Julian calendar, which is why the event is often referred to as the October Revolution), leftist revolutionaries led by Bolshevik Party leader Vladimir Lenin launched a nearly bloodless coup d'etat against the Duma's provisional government.
The date of Orthodox Easter, however, is not set by the Julian calendar as suggested in your article, but rather by the Jewish calendar.
(Cervantes actually died 10 days earlier since Spain had already adopted the Gregorian calendar ahead of England, which was still using the Julian calendar.) This significant coincidence prompted theUnited Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization in 1995 to declare April 23 as World Book and Copyright Day.