Julian of Norwich


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Related to Julian of Norwich: Margery Kempe

Julian of Norwich

n
(Biography) ?1342–?1413, English mystic and anchoress: best known for the Revelations of Divine Love describing her visions

Jul′ian of Nor′wich


n.
c1342–c1413, English mystic.
References in periodicals archive ?
In sections on identity, memory, and counter-reformation, 11 papers look Catholicism in early modern England from such perspectives as creating an English Catholic identity: relics, martyrs, and English women religious in counter-reformation Europe; the vicars apostolic and the suppressed/restored English province of the Society of Jesus; Julian of Norwich, Margaret Gascoigne, and textual circulation among the Cambrai Benedictines; underground networks, prison, and the circulation of counter-reformation books in Elizabethan England; and the Gospel, liturgy, and controversy in the 1590s: Thomas Stapleton's Promptuaria.
In the present study of this controverted text, I will pursue a less tragic, more optimistic reading of the poem and the court by juxtaposing Gawain's girdle as token of sin with tokens spoken of by the visionary Julian of Norwich.
Julian of Norwich was an English anchoress and an important Christian mystic and theologian.
His magnum opus, "The Book Of Holy Medicines", is now accessible to modern English-speaking readers as a classic of medieval spirituality and lay writing alongside the works of Margery Kempe and Julian of Norwich.
Chenard's stories echoed the faith of Julian of Norwich who when faced by the devastation of the plague spoke words of hope: "All will be well, all will be well, all manner of thing will be well.
Julian's Gospel: Illuminating the Life and Revelations of Julian of Norwich.
Veronica Mary Rolf's JULIAN'S GOSPEL: ILLUMINATING THE LIFE & REVELATIONS OF JULIAN OF NORWICH (9781626980945, $30.
Julian of Norwich, a medieval English mystic, describes God as both Father and Mother: "God rejoices that he is our Father, and God rejoices that he is our Mother.
As Marsha Dutton explains, referring specifically to the visions of Julian of Norwich, the fourteenth-century mystic, any knowledge gained through personal revelation must eventually be re-understood through the lens of rationality (113).
She is moved by Anna's compelling confessional about her life-changing encounter with Julian of Norwich - an extraordinary woman from another age, who risked death at the stake to write a secret manuscript revealing the truth entrusted to her.
Non-dualism in Eckhart, Julian of Norwich and Traherne; a theopoetic reflection.
the same nut Julian of Norwich feels she is holding