jumping spider

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jumping spider

n
(Animals) any spider of the family Salticidae, esp Attulus saltator, that catch their prey by hunting and can jump considerable distances

jump′ing spi`der


n.
any of several small, hairy spiders of the family Salticidae, that stalk and jump upon their prey.
[1805–15]
References in classic literature ?
The variety of species among the jumping spiders appears almost infinite.
Taylor LA, Amin Z, Maier EB, Byrne KJ and Morehouse NI (2016) Flexible color learning in an invertebrate predator: Jumping spiders can learn to prefer or avoid red during foraging.
Photos of jumping spiders show the small arachnids eating frogs and lizards larger than they are, injecting them with venom and then feeding on their corpses.
According to National Geographic, a new study published in the Journal of Arachnology titled 'A vertebrate-eating jumping spider (Araneae: Salticidae) from Florida, USA' documented instances when regal jumping spiders were sighted hunting and eating animals larger than themselves, such as frogs and lizards.
Several large families of hunting spiders are also highly visual (Land, 1985; Foelix, 2011), including the wolf spiders (Lycosidae), lynx spiders (Oxyopidae), and jumping spiders (Salticidae).
In an earlier trial, jumping spiders reduced Adam, 28, to a screaming wreck.
He explains their sensory and perceptual processes, learning, spatial cognition and behavior, timing, numerical cognition, emotions, communication, and complex cognition about planning, social learning, and cognition about the minds of others, then provides case studies of honeybees, jumping spiders, cephalopods, corvids, parrots, dolphins, dogs, and great apes.
Jumping spiders are strongly influenced by habitat type (Uetz, 1991; Cumming & Wesolowska, 2004; Rubio, 2015).
The programme features footage of tigers using their surroundings to ambush deer, as well as examining the strategies adopted by sparrowhawks, jumping spiders, tarsiers, eagles and chimpanzees.
The jumping spiders (Salticidae) of the subregion have been the focus of considerable taxonomic study in recent years, leading to the description of a multitude of new taxa and redescriptions of some poorly known species (Wesolowska 1999a, 2006, 2011; Wesolowska & Cumming 2008, 2011; Wesolowska & Haddad 2009, 2013; Azarkina & Logunov 2010; Haddad & Wesolowska 2011, 2013; Azarkina & Foord 2013; Wesolowska et al.