Jungian


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Jung·i·an

 (yo͝ong′ē-ən)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of Jung or his theories of psychology.
2. Maintaining Jung's psychological theories, especially those that stress the contribution of racial and cultural inheritance to the psychology of an individual.

Jung′i·an n.

Jungian

(ˈjʊŋɪən)
adj
(Psychiatry) of, following, or relating to C. G. Jung, his system of psychoanalysis, or to analytical psychology

Jung•i•an

(ˈyʊŋ i ən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Carl G. Jung or his psychological theories.
n.
2. an advocate or follower of Jung's theories.
[1930–35]

Jungian

Typical of the psychological theories of Carl Jung, especially his belief in the important effect of race and culture on an individual’s psychology.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jungian - a follower or advocate of Carl Jung's theories
follower - a person who accepts the leadership of another
Adj.1.Jungian - of or relating to Carl Jung or his psychological theories
Translations

Jungian

[jʊŋɪən]
A. ADJjungiano
B. Njungiano/a m/f
References in periodicals archive ?
Their topics include Jung in the academy and beyond: the Fordham Lectures 100 years later, collective memory and common imagination: archetypes in the perspective of the theory of sign, whether the Jungian concept of "image" is still relevant in a modern psychoanalytic perspective, developing Jung's theory of mind in light of evolutionary psychology, evidence for the effectiveness of Jungian psychotherapy: a review of empirical studies, and how to objectify a study on analytical psychology.
New Rochelle, NY, October 23, 2018 --(PR.com)-- New Coaching Concept Fuses Jungian Spiritual Psychology and Corporate Leadership.
Many scholars in the field of Jungian psychology have utilized neuroscience as a means of exploring the validity of Jungian archetypes and to further develop archetypal ideas (Goodwyn, 2010, 2013; Hogenson, 2009; Knox, 2004, 2010; Merchant, 2009, 2016; Stevens, 1995).
African Americans and Jungian Psychology: Leaving the Shadows.
Change the Story of Your Health: Using Shamanic and Jungian Techniques for Healing discusses alternative medical traditions that inject spirituality into the overall fields of physical and mental health, and comes from a clinical psychologist and Jungian analyst who has used these techniques, in conjunction with Western medicine, to help his own physical ailments and those of his clients.
We are pleased to present five articles on topics ranging from a Jungian perspective of Dissociative Identity Disorder to the journey from separation consciousness to God consciousness.
In Change the Story of Your Health, clinical psychologist Carl Greer explains how to create a transformative health story using shamanic and Jungian techniques.
Renowned in the field of Jungian analysis, she earned a diploma from the C.G.
Synopsis: The Red Book was always a true legend in the Jungian movement.
Still, true to his other books in the "Jungian romance" genre (which he created), he continues to explore the psychological aspects of relationship.
Its overall structure has three themes: a historical dimension that looks at Jung's own opinions on the issue, a critical dimension that looks at the nature of science and its implications for Jungian theorizing, and a consolidant dimension that attempts to reconcile it with other worldviews, such as Orthodox Christianity or political psychology.
I contend that Wordsworth's poetry provides us with a rich ground for exploring symbolic messages especially coded in his treatment of Nature which for Wordsworth is what a Jungian would call the unconscious.