analytical psychology

(redirected from Jungian analysis)
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Related to Jungian analysis: Jungian dream analysis

analytical psychology

n
(Psychoanalysis) a school of psychoanalysis founded by Jung as a result of disagreements with Freud. See also archetype, collective unconscious

analytical psychology

The process of attempting to explain or relieve disturbance by looking into the unconscious forces governing behavior. The term is also used more specifically to refer to the school of Carl Jung.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Critical Dictionary of Jungian Analysis. London and New York: Routledge.
Renowned in the field of Jungian analysis, she earned a diploma from the C.G.
Their author, however, is a music composer with an interest in Freud and Jungian analysis. Jungian analysis is the lens through which the author views each Romantic or modernist novel, film, symphony, or painting he discusses.
"Essbaum's novel is technically adept: creative, detailed, carefully foreshadowed, able to combine Jungian analysis, linguistics and graphic sex scenes in one book.
She tries new things--German language classes, Jungian analysis, and a series of sexual affairs with an ease that surprises even her.
Drawing on the scholarship of Ancient Jewish mysticism and its influence on Freudian and Jungian analysis, "Inner Messiah, Divine Character" helps readers discover the "Be" within their "Being" to create new opportunities in the present, motivates readers to perceive "Beyond" their limitations and ordinary expectations, and encourages readers to strive for the superlative in their endeavors to achieve their "Best".
I mean, that would be a tough one on In The Psychiatrist's Chair, but in your second language, in conversation with a bunch of former footballers who you felt probably had more interest in hair styling than Jungian analysis, it was particularly unpromising territory.
In Jungian analysis, and the labyrinth means depression and this is separate from the rooms so that Prospero avoid confrontation with depression and limits, so he takes refuge in anger and party.
Relying on Jungian analysis and finding promising directions from Islam, Shedinger argues for the development of personal identity apart from religious identity.
This book of observations is woven from developmental psychology, Jungian analysis, Franciscan piety and ecumenical theology of the late 20th century.
(1986).A Critical Dictionary of Jungian Analysis. London and New York: Routledge.
Francis was in Jungian analysis and also explored Zen Buddhism while living in Japan.