Corpus Juris Civilis

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Corpus Juris Civilis

(sɪˈvaɪlɪs)
n
(Law) law the body of Roman or civil law consolidated by Justinian in the 6th century ad. It consists of four parts, the Institutes, Digest, Code, and Novels
[New Latin, literally: body of civil law]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Blume, and Clyde Pharr (1883-1972): careers, scholarship, and translations; and the denouement: Justinian's Code in 21st-century America.
The Justinian Code, or Codex, is one of the four parts of the Corpus Iuris Civilis, which is sometimes confusingly referred to in its entirety as the Code of Justinian or--even more confusingly Justinian's Code. Id.
(113) The glossators studied historical as well as contemporary texts adding gloss to the canon law, Justinian's code, and the digests of the Roman law.
In Memorials Dee was concerned primarily with unmolested movement along trading routes and with protecting the queen's sovereign rights as "empress" within the "ancient bounds and limits" of the "British Empire.(16) For the first, Dee claimed that common sea passage was a right of all sovereign princes and that neither the Portuguese nor the Spanish kings had any right to restrict passage, for the purposes of trade, on any oceans and seas.(17) Justinian's code made a similar proclamation in the Institutes, that "by natural law, the following things are free to all men, namely: air, running water, the sea, and for this reason the shores of the sea.
[31] A similar conception of sapientia was also a hallmark of the medieval and Renaissance legal tradition; medieval jurists, harking back to Justinian's Code, defined law (lex) as the knowledge of things both human and divine.