Corpus Juris Civilis

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Related to Justinian's Digest: Codex Justinianus

Corpus Juris Civilis

(sɪˈvaɪlɪs)
n
(Law) law the body of Roman or civil law consolidated by Justinian in the 6th century ad. It consists of four parts, the Institutes, Digest, Code, and Novels
[New Latin, literally: body of civil law]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
It seems that this work, which epitomized Justinian's Digest and Code, was not studied in its own fight but served as a useful companion to the study of canon law.
I have referred to the subject matter of the Jurisprudence scattered into the books of Justinian's Digest to specific chapters and headings.
He once wrote that while at the University of Louvain, where he studied in the 1550s, he had "entered into a plain and due understanding of diverse civil laws, accounted very intricate and dark." (21) Writing in 1597, he indicated that during his life he had spent "some few hours" extracting "out of certain Roman, and other civil laws, judgements and answers, written De acquirendo rerum Dominio (in the book of Digests, contained.)" (22) This was a reference to Justinian's Digest. The chapter named by Dee--book forty-one, chapter one, entitled "Acquisition of ownership of things"--contains the most important legal precedents regarding possession and use of land and seas in all Roman jurisprudence.